Reviews and Blog Posts: new orleans

If I only had a horn : young Louis Armstrong

by Roxane Orgill

Reviewer Rating:
4

This is a children’s book telling a story of jazz giant Louis Armstrong’s first encounters with a cornet. Illustrated by Leonard Jenkins, the book has stunning illustrations done in acrylic, spray paint and pastel reminiscent of fine artist Francis Bacon, but much more intimate (and age appropriate) and matches the...

Treme. The complete first season

Reviewer Rating:
3

 Treme is set in New Orleans shortly after Hurricane Katrina. It follows characters representing different aspects of the city’s culture as they try to resume their lives after the devastation.  It’s apparent from watching Treme that the writer, David Simon, has a lot of admiration for the music and traditions...

Gossamer ghost

by Laura Childs

Reviewer Rating:
3

If you like cozy mysteries, you can’t go wrong with Laura Childs and her various series. Gossamer Ghost, part of the Scrapbook series, is set in New Orleans.  Carmela, the main character hears a noise in the shop next door and ends up getting involved with solving the murder of...

Chef

Reviewer Rating:
4

Chef Carl Casper (Jon Favreau) is frustrated and bored with the uninspired menu at the restaurant where he works when a scathing review from top online food critic Ramsey Michel (Oliver Platt) topples what self esteem he has left. An unwise social media blow up about the review loses Chef...

Coming through slaughter

by Michael Ondaatje

Reviewer Rating:
5

Coming through Slaughter has been called the best jazz novel ever written, with a lyrical writing style compared to jazz music. It’s a fictional biography about one of the original trumpet giants of New Orleans, Buddy Bolden. Though it takes place around 1907 and was written in the late 1970’s,...

Faubourg Tremé the untold story of Black New Orleans

Reviewer Rating:
5

This is an informative and moving documentary. It accomplishes mixing the rich history of the Faubourg Tremé with contemporary momentous footage. Created and narrated by a resident of Tremé, the documentary outlines the neighborhood from its origin through the birth of civil rights and jazz and the devastation of Hurricane...

A confederacy of dunces

by John Kennedy Toole

Reviewer Rating:
3

Working with readers at DPL, I've noticed that this novel is often cited as either a reader's most favorite or least favorite novel. Naturally, I had to see for myself on which side of the line I fell. And wouldn't you know it? I came down right in the middle.

Out of the Easy

by Ruta Sepetys

Reviewer Rating:
4

Working mornings as the clean-up girl at a bordello in New Orleans is not as near and dear to Josie’s heart as her other job at Marlowe’s Bookstore in 1950.   Surrounding her are Willie, the tough madam who knows how to run things, Cokie, the chauffeur, Patrick and Charlie Marlowe...

Island beneath the sea : a novel

by Isabel Allende

Reviewer Rating:
4

The story begins in Haiti shortly before the French Revolution and follows Zarité, bought as a child to be the personal slave of a wealthy sugar cane plantation owner's new wife, through her experiences and relationships.  I loved the historical aspect of this book, from the heartbreaking descriptions of the...

A Galactic St. Patty's Day

Galactic: Photo by Greg Aiello

This coming Saint Patrick's Day, some may be celebrating the chasing of snakes out of Ireland or simply Irish heritage with some lively fiddle music and colcannon, but if, like many, you're just looking for a big party, head to the Ogden to see New Orleans funk band Galactic.

When I saw Galactic live, I had never heard of them before, and tagged along at the end of an already full day thinking it would be a nice, relaxing evening of New Orleans jazz. I mistakenly thought the opening band was Galactic. Then the real deal came out and the Fillmore filled up to the brim. Sandwiched tightly in the crush of the wild crowd right in front of the stage, I soon learned that Galactic shows are nothing to fool around with.

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