Reviews and Blog Posts: immigrant experience

Just like us [the true story of four Mexican girls coming of age in America]

by Helen Thorpe

Reviewer Rating:

The book can be a little hard to get through because there are some very strong political views expressed, not by the writer, but by both sides of the debate. You wish that things had been different for these girls, especially since it can be seen as if there fate...

Plaza Voices: Immigrant Bazaar - "Far from home...homemade goods"

Naghem S., a Plaza staff member, writes:

On Saturday September 19, 2015, the Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzales Branch Library hosted the Immigrant Bazaar. Merchants from all walks of life showcased their beautiful homemade goods. Along with tasty food and a gorgeous late summer day, this event is one to be remembered for days to come. Sitting under tents and enjoying the energetic environment, vendors supplied customers with an extensive variety of food, art, clothing, jewelry, and film.

Plaza Voices: Celebrating Citizenship Day!

According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, 654,949 people were welcomed as citizens in 2014. On September 17th, Citizenship Day will commemorate this milestone for new Americans. Becoming a citizen in the United States is often a joyous experience for new immigrants who spend years studying for the naturalization test.

Plaza Voices: The Boulder County Latino History Project

Cover of "La Gente," available at DPL

According to the Pew Research Center, Colorado is home to 1,071,000 Latinos, including immigrants and their descendants as well as Colorado natives, whose families were here before Colorado was part of the United States.

Just so happens

by Fumio Obata

Reviewer Rating:

This is one of the most elegant, perfectly illustrated comics I’ve seen in a long time. I literally gasped at each page: Obata’s control with watercolor is masterful without being overstated and his minimal approach to color perfectly fits the story. If you're looking for a thoughtful break from mainstream...

Plaza Voices: Second Generation

Cover of Legacies: The Story of the Immigrant Second Generation

Of the many reasons people leave their home countries to start lives in a new place, "opportunity" has to be one of the most common.

The first generation makes the leap, leaving friends, family, and history behind. What happens to their children, the ones born here? What opportunities do they embrace, and what do they value?

Plaza Voices: Telling Our Stories

Cover of Purpose, by Wyclef Jean, available at DPL

Personal stories are fascinating. They enliven history, putting events into a context we can understand. They bridge the gaps between our own experiences and those of others, as we see common human concerns arise in circumstances vastly different from our own. More than anything, personal histories help us to empathize with people whose lives we may have never imagined.

Plaza Voices: Immigrant Women

Cover of Danticat's Behind the Mountains, available from DPL

March is Women's History Month, and a time to explore the experiences and contributions of immigrant women here in America.

Both the Migration Policy Institute and the American Immigration Council offer demographic information on immigrant women, detailing country of origin, occupation, and education level.

Plaza Voices: World Immigration in Film

Film poster for "In Between Days," available from DPL

Immigration is in the news, not just here in the U.S. but around the world. This week we bring you a selection of international films that explore the immigrant experience, both here and across the globe.

Plaza Voices: Stories of Integration

Photo from the "Stories of Integration" series on view at Barnum Library

Desiree S. of the Ross-Barnum branch writes:

Moving away from one’s home can be one of the most challenging life experiences. Having come to Denver via Oklahoma City myself just one year ago, I can certainly vouch for there being a period of readjustment -- one has to discover all new neighborhoods, meet all new friends and perhaps reconnect with old ones. In short, one must create an everyday existence that is different from what was there before. But what about adjusting to a place where both the language and the culture are completely foreign?

Syndicate content