Blogs

Party Time

Bite by Bite

Summer is nearly here!

Individuals often have gatherings this
time of year. DPL has books to assist you planning and making your gatherings /parties special.

Yoga With Kids

You Are a Lion!

Add a little yoga to your child's morning routine or help your little one wind down before bed with some deep breathing and restful poses. Practicing yoga with kids is a fun and gentle way to exercise. Plus, yoga provides a chance to bond with your child while introducing new vocabulary words. Moo and meow in cat-cow pose or sing your favorite nursery rhymes as you hold a balance pose.

In addition to physical benefits like improved balance and coordination and mental benefits like better concentration, yoga offers an opportunity to spend quality time with your child while improving her vocabulary. Having a large vocabulary and understanding the meaning behind words leads to reading success and achievement later in school.

Great Audio Books for Family Road Trips

A Year Down Yonder

A recent New York Times Book Review article sings the praises of audio books and recommends several gems for family road trips. With summer right around the corner, it’s a nice reminder that audio books are the perfect way to keep the whole family happy on long car drives.

I have three children, and when we take a road trip, we always have several audio books on hand. I find they are far superior to DVDs for making a road trip a fun family experience. Unlike videos, which only the kids can watch, audio books are something the whole family (including the driver of the car!) can enjoy. In addition, we can listen to the audio books while also looking out the window. And – really – what’s the point of a road trip if you aren’t taking in the majestic scenery rolling past?

The Denver Public Library Brings The BASS BOOM To Your Summer!!

Bassnecter sells out Red Rocks again

It's loud, it's crazy, and it has been known to destroy sound systems from N.Y. to L.A., but Colorado is its third-largest market in the US.  It may be scary, but it's growing an army of fans here...it's DUBSTEP, and it's packing every venue in the state with its bass embrace!

Forged in South London in early 2001, dance producers started taking the tempo of 2-step and merging it with the dark bass of Jungle/Drum & Bass music to form a new genre that record label Tempa called "Dubstep" in 2002.  Championed by U.K.

Waiting for Are You My Mother?

Are You My Mother?

Over the weekend I read Alison Bechdel's new graphic memoir, Are You My Mother?: A Comic Drama.

This follow up to her 2006 memoir Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic, which focused on her father, concentrates both on her relationship with her mother and on her therapy process. At one point, Bechdel refers to Are You My Mother? as a meta-book, as much of it deals with the time period when she was writing Fun Home, as well as her interactions with her mother around writing both that book and Are You My Mother?

Pre-Holiday Fun with Fresh City Life My Branch

Feng Shui Garden

While you're making your Memorial Day weekend plans, take a mini break this week with a Fresh City Life My Branch event!

If you're planning on working in your garden this weekend, why not apply some Feng Shui principles? Lorrie Webb Grillo of Thriving Spaces will be presenting Feng Shui in the Garden twice this week:

Tuesday, May 22 at 6 p.m. at the Ross-University Hills Branch

Wednesday, May 23 at 6 p.m. at the Smiley Branch

It hasn't been a Norman Rockwell painting, but it's been a fun trip

Norman Rockwell's Family Vacation

I often looked at Norman Rockwell paintings and felt a twinge of jealousy -- wishing that those perfect scenes had been a part of my life story. Then I found out that even Norman Rockwell wished that the scenes he painted had been a part of his real life.

In truth, Rockwell was born in New York City in 1894 and lived a hard-scrabble childhood on the wrong side of the tracks. So his paintings of scrubbed up Americana are really just his own yearnings for a life he never had. The life he did have was exciting and full of creativity and he left a lasting artistic legacy in the hundreds of paintings he did for the cover of the Saturday Evening Post, Life and other magazines.

HOW TO GROW FABULOUS TOMATOES

American humorist and writer Lewis Grizzard once said, "It's difficult to think anything but pleasant thoughts while eating a homegrown tomato."

I have pleasant thoughts just thinking about eating a homegrown tomato, and that's why every summer I put forth a lot of effort, time and money to get them.

Tomatoes like a long growing season, warm nights, consistent moisture, and acidic soil that is mostly humus. Colorado has a short growing season, cool nights, droughts and clay, alkaline soil. In spite of these challenges, delicious tomatoes can be yours if you follow a few simple rules.

KIDS - Recommended New Books

from Fake Mustache by Tom Angleberger

Every month, librarians from Denver Public Library branches get together to talk about new books for school-aged kids. With summer vacation just around the corner, here are some great new titles to keep you reading all summer long.

Younger Readers:

Letters to Leo by Amy Hest. Annie's dad has finally given in and let her get a dog, so now Annie writes letters to her new pet during the school day so he can keep up with all of the exciting things that happen to her while she is away from him. Annie is not exactly a "model citizen" and there are lots of funny stories and drawings throughout the book. Recommended by Gigi from the Children's Library.

The Denver Public Library faces a potential $2.4 million budget reduction for 2013

Last month, the Denver Public Library received a $2.4 million budget reduction target for 2013 from the City Budget Office.  As in past years, all City agencies, including DPL, are given an initial budget number and are required to submit their ideas on how to reach their target.

The Library’s 2012 budget from the City’s General Fund is $32,104,500, which funds 18 of the 23 branches at only four days (32 hours) a week; four branches at six days (48 hours) a week; and one branch at four days a week and four hours on Sunday (36 hours). The Central Library is open 52 hours a week, with weekend hours from 1- 5 p.m. The new branch opening in Stapleton this summer (which was built with voter-approved Better Denver Bond funds) will be at a service level of 32 hours – or open only four days per week.

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