Reviews and Blog Posts: Science Fiction

Ender's game

by Orson Scott Card

DPL Rating:
5

This book is amazing. I have read this book more times than i can remember and will reread the first three books in this series about every other year. If you have not yet discovered the awesome amazingness that is the Enderverse yet then hold onto your pants and get...

Neuromancer

by William Gibson

DPL Rating:
4

I’ve been having nightmares for a week. Maybe it’s because the people who populate William Gibson’s book seem only half-human, with ports implanted in their necks and software programs running directly through their brains. Maybe it’s a main character, Case, who can kick his drug habit, but only after he...

Locus Award Finalists Announced

Welcome to Bordertown

The Locus Science Fiction Foundation recently announced the finalists for the 2012 Locus Awards. The Locus Award celebrates science fiction, fantasy, and horror, and nonfiction works related to these subjects. If you're looking for a good read, try some of these!

Science Fiction Novel:

Leviathan Wakes, James S.A. Corey

11/22/63, Stephen King

Embassytown, China Mieville

Rule 34, Charles Stross

Hugo Nominees Announced!

Among Others

The nominees for the Hugo Award, given in 15 categories by the members of the World Science Fiction Convention, were recently announced. For the complete list, check the Hugo website.

Here are some of the nominated novels, works of nonfiction, and films that the Denver Public Library owns:

Best Novel:

Among Others, Jo Walton

A Dance With Dragons, George R. R. Martin

Deadline, Mira Grant

Embassytown, China Miéville

James Tiptree Jr. Award Announced!

Deathless

The James Tiptree Jr. Award is a literary award given annually to science fiction or fantasy (novels, novellas, short stories) that expands or explores our understanding of gender. The award is named after Alice B. Sheldon, who wrote under the male name James Tiptree Jr. in order to be more accepted by publishers of science fiction.

While some of these books/stories may not be in the Denver Public Library's collection, they may be worth seeking out if you are interested in issues of gender in science fiction and fantasy. Please note all the teen books on the list--several of which were on my favorite reads of 2011 list!

The 2011 Tiptree Award Winner is: Redwood and Wildfire by Andrea Hairston (Aqueduct Press, 2011)

The Honor List includes:

2012: Are You Ready?

2012: The War for Souls

The year 2012 is fast approaching. To many writers, 2012 seemed like a good year far in the future in which to set their stories. Other books are centered around a prophecy that the world will end in 2012. Get ready for the new year with some fiction set in 2012!

Angel Fire East, Terry Brooks

2012 Airborne Prophecy, Nina Anderson

Apocalypse 2012 & The 2012 Codex, Gary Jennings

Domain, Steve Alten

In Praise of Connie Willis

Blackout

The 2011 Hugo Award winner for Best Novel happens to be one of my favorite writers, Colorado author Connie Willis.

Many people may see Willis' books in the science fiction section, winning science fiction awards, and immediately think that those books are not for them. I urge you to reconsider.

Ready Player One

Ready Player One

 Have you heard about Ernst Cline's Ready Player One?  Filled with tons of 80s pop culture references, it might be worth doing a bit of extra research to keep up.  We can help.

Set in the near future, Ready Player One is the story of Wade Watts, a poor, orphaned kid whose only escape is entering the vast virtual world of OASIS.  In OASIS, Wade's avatar spends endless hours attempting to solve clues and puzzles in order to find the three keys that will unlock the vast inheritance left by the company's founder, Halliday, who created this hunt as his legacy.  In tribute to his 1980s upbringing, Halliday has loaded the game with all sort of cultural icons and trivia.  Wade and&n

2045: A Story of Our Future

2045:  A Story of Our Future

As a general rule, I don't read much fiction.

However, I have a weakness for post-apocalyptic, sci-fi dystopian pieces. Think Bradbury (Fahrenheit 451) and Dick (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep). Confessional sidebar: I'm a much bigger fan of the film Blade Runner (which is, of course, based on Androids) than I am of the book. Both succeed, however, in firing the cylinders of the brain and sparking imagination.

In Praise of Mary Doria Russell

Doc

Do you love literary fiction? Historical fiction? Science fiction? This author is a rare find - someone who can cross genres with ease, style, and literary merit. She has won many national and international awards for her work. If you haven't read her, you should!

Many years ago, I discovered The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell and loved it, but somehow with all of the other books on my list, I never revisited her work. Then, this year, Doc hit our featured titles table. I snagged a copy and devoured it in three days. It was so good, I was compelled to read every work of fiction she ever wrote.

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