Reviews and Blog Posts: fiction

NOS4A2 : a novel

by Joe Hill

Reviewer Rating:
5

Vic McQueen can find things. With the help of her trusty bike and the Shorter Way Bridge (which collapsed in 1985, but lives on in her inscape), she can get to any lost object.  Throughout her adolescence, she travels the bridge, until she goes looking for trouble, and finds Charlie...

East of Denver Author Gregory Hill Visits Ross-Cherry Creek

East of Denver

Colorado author Gregory Hill joins the Fresh City Life My Branch Colorado Authors Series lineup at the Ross-Cherry Creek Branch on Wednesday, May 15 at 6:30 p.m.

Hill's novel, East of Denver, won the 2011 Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award, is a Colorado Book Award finalist in the Literary Fiction category, and was named "one of the year's best crime novels" by Booklist. East of Denver combines going home, family, misfit friends, a plane, a farm, humor, and a bank robbery to create a unique reading experience.

The Best in Mystery--Edgar and Agatha Winners

The Expats

The winners of both the Edgar Awards and the Agatha Awards were recently announced, so if you're looking to add a bit of mystery to your summer reading, look no further!

The Edgars, named after Edgar Allan Poe, honor the best in mystery fiction, nonfiction, and television. The Agathas, named after Agatha Christie, honor the "traditional" mystery as exemplified by Christie's works. This is the award for you if you're looking for mysteries with no explicit sex, gratuitous violence, or gore. No "hard boiled" mysteries here. Check out these lists, and maybe discover a new favorite mystery author!

The Edgar winners:

Author! Author!

Animal Mineral Radical

Fresh City Life My Branch presents 4 upcoming author events that you won't want to miss!

All events are free and open to the public. Authors will have their books available to sell and sign!

Do You Read Cli Fi?

Solar

Did you hear this NPR story on what they call an emerging new genre in fiction---Cli Fi, or fiction around issues of climate change?

Meeting at some point between science fiction, apocalyptic fiction, thriller, and contemporary fiction, these books take some of today's predictions and warnings about climate change and extrapolate. With Earth Day and the weather on many people's minds these days, it might be time to try one of these reads. They range from thought-provoking to thrilling!

The Odds Against Tomorrow, Nathaniel Rich

Read Me, I'm Irish!

A statue of James Joyce in Dublin

This St. Patrick's Day, pass over the leprechauns, green beer, and clovers in silence and enjoy a true celebration of Irish culture in the works of this triumvirate of Irish literary giants.

Entertain your friends over the holiday weekend by reciting Jem Casey's "The Workman's Friend" or quoting the stately, plump Buck Mulligan.

Celebrate Women's Fiction

Alif the Unseen

Celebrate Women's History Month by reading some of the outstanding fiction by female authors on the recently announced Women's Prize for Fiction (formerly the Orange Prize) long list.

Now in its 18th year, the U.K. prize celebrates fiction written in English by women. The long list finalists are from various countries, including the U.K., Israel, Canada, the United States, New Zealand, Turkey, and Australia. Check out one of these great titles today, and look for the short list announcement in April and the winner in June!

A Trick I Learned from Dead Men, Kitty Aldridge

Alif the Unseen, G. Willow Wilson

Lambda Literary Award Finalists Announced

Theft

The finalists for the 25th annual Lambda Literary Awards were recently announced. The Lammys celebrate GLBT literature and are given in many categories, including fiction, romance, biography/memoir, children's/young adult, and sf/fantasy/horror.

If you want your next read to have GLBT themse, this is a great list to start with! For the complete list of finalists, see the Lambda Literary Foundation web site. The site also lists past winners and nominees. 

James Tiptree, Jr. Awards Announced

The Drowning Girl

The James Tiptree, Jr. Award and honor books were recently announced.

What is the Tiptree? Given since 1991, it is "an annual literary prize for science fiction or fantasy that expands or explores our understanding of gender...The aim of the award is not to look for work that falls into some narrow definition of political correctness, but rather to seek out work that is thought-provoking, imaginative, and perhaps even infuriating." The Tiptree is named after Alice B. Sheldon, who used the pen name James Tiptree, Jr. to publish her science fiction and fantasy stories, genres largely closed to women at the time she was writing.

Cold, Colder, Coldest

Antarctica

During the colder months, some folks like to read about tropical climates and warm days. I have a tendency to want to read about places that are even colder than where I am.

Enter my obsession over books about Antarctica. I don't know that I'll ever get to visit there, but I do love to read about it, both in fiction and nonfiction. While there is a vast body of literature about Antarctic explorers such as Amundsen, Shackleton, and Scott, my reading about the cold continent tends to be about modern folks--scientists and other curious types--who have recorded their time there and are often studying the (few) animals that live there, along with other studies including climate change, the earth's history, and even the possibilities of life on Mars.

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