Lisa's blog

"A DAY IN POMPEII" COMING TO THE MUSEUM OF NATURE AND SCIENCE

August 24, 79 AD, started out like any other day in the thriving Roman town of Pompeii, with citizens socializing at the public baths, watching gladiator contests, preparing meals and going to school. The popular resort town was located in the shadow of Mt. Vesuvius, which hadn't erupted in hundreds of years.

A series of small earthquakes in the last few days may have caused some uneasiness, however. Only seventeen years earlier, a big earthquake had caused massive damage, which the citizens of Pompeii were still trying to repair. At the time, the correlation between earthquakes and volcanic activity was unknown; but the longer a volcano is silent, the bigger the explosion when it finally does erupt.

PATRICIA HIGHSMITH

“Honestly, I don't understand why people get so worked up about a little murder!”
― Patricia Highsmith, Ripley Under Ground

Among the writers of crime novels and offbeat thrillers, few writers have managed to be as enduring in appeal among readers and critics alike as Patricia Highsmith, whose startlingly original creations includes one of the most singularly charming killers in all of fiction.

"WAIT! YOU'VE GOT THE WRONG GUY!"

There are times when you wish you were somebody else - giving a speech, shopping for a swimsuit or receiving a dental deep cleaning are just a few of them. Reinventing yourself is rarely an option in real life, but it does happen in the movies.

Whether somebody got switched at birth, faked their own death or is wrongly accused of a crime, there is a mistaken identity film for everyone.

Here are some of my favorites:

The Big Lebowski (1998)

GIMME A BREAK - A COFFEE BREAK, THAT IS

Most Sunday mornings, I watch my favorite barista, Sonia, prepare lattes, cappuccinos, and cafe Americanos at the Market on Larimer Square. She remembers everyone's name and what they order, then proceeds to prepare it in blur of activity, all while catching up on her customers' lives or commenting on the relative difficulty or ease of the New York Times Crossword.

Sonia is one of 20 million people employed in this huge global industry; coffee is a commodity that is second only to petroleum in dollars traded worldwide. Per-capita global consumption works out to 400 cups annually, making it the world's most popular beverage.

LET THE PARTIES BEGIN - WATCHING THE SUMMER OLYMPICS

The first Olympic Games were held in 776 BCE in order to honor Zeus, while showcasing Greece's finest athletes and promoting goodwill among Greek cities. The event lasted for one day and consisted of a foot race for men only, who competed in their birthday suits and were coated in olive oil.

Today, more than 9 million spectators will watch over 10,000 athletes (nicely attired and oil-free) from more than 200 countries compete in everything from springboard diving to table tennis. Here are some tips for following the action and planning your own Olympic celebrations.

PROPOSAL WRITING AND BUDGETING BASICS CLASS

THIS CLASS IS FULL

If you are new to the nonprofit world or would just like to brush up on your proposal writing skills, join us on Monday, August 6th from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. at the Central Library in the B-2 Conference Center for this free class.

Guest speaker Scott Ullman, the regional training coordinator for the Foundation Center, will cover these topics:

CAREER SPOTLIGHT: RESPIRATORY THERAPIST

Kari Woodruff started her training in respiratory therapy intending to use it as a way to gain clinical experience and move on to be a physician's assistant. But she came to value the work too much to abandon it. "Once I started clinicals," she recalls, "I fell in love with taking care of infants and children with breathing problems, and I remained in the field."

Respiratory therapists are healthcare practitioners who diagnose and treat people who suffer from heart and lung problems. They typically work in a hospital setting but sometimes visit patients in their homes. There are also specialists within the profession, and they help people who have asthma, cystic fibrosis or sleep disorders. They can also be anesthesia assistants, be involved in pulmonary research or provide emergency care for patients suffering from hearts attacks or stroke.

ELEVATOR TO THE GALLOWS

Louis Malle had his feature filmmaking debut at age twenty-four with this spellbinding thriller that takes place one night in Paris. Beautiful Florence (Jeanne Moreau) and her lover Julien (Maurice Ronet) murder her wealthy husband, which leads to mistaken identity and more murder.

As Julien attempts to retrieve an incriminating piece of evidence from the crime, he becomes trapped in an elevator while Florence wanders the rainy, neon-lit night, thinking she's been abandoned. Meanwhile, an impulsive teenage couple has stolen Julien's car and gone on a joyride, which results in tragedy -- and more complications for Julien.

HOW TO GROW FABULOUS TOMATOES

American humorist and writer Lewis Grizzard once said, "It's difficult to think anything but pleasant thoughts while eating a homegrown tomato."

I have pleasant thoughts just thinking about eating a homegrown tomato, and that's why every summer I put forth a lot of effort, time and money to get them.

Tomatoes like a long growing season, warm nights, consistent moisture, and acidic soil that is mostly humus. Colorado has a short growing season, cool nights, droughts and clay, alkaline soil. In spite of these challenges, delicious tomatoes can be yours if you follow a few simple rules.

REMEMBERING 1962 - THE YEAR THAT CHANGED EVERYTHING

Fifty years ago, moviegoers saw a number of spectacles, ambitious art films and genre-busting originals unlike anything they'd seen before. One was a thrilling spy adventure, packed with sleek sets and international intrigue surrounding the space race -- and a sexy, amoral, supremely confident hero with a license to kill.

 

The movie was, of course, Dr. No, the first in the most enduring and popular film franchise of all time, still going strong today. Although less gadget-crazy than its successors, the first James Bond film established the formula (mysteriously deformed ;but superhuman villain, nifty secret lair, Bond girl in jeopardy, etc.) for much of what was to come. And it was part of a larger upheaval that magical year -- in movies, pop music, politics, and more -- that marks the true beginning of what we mean when we talk about the Sixties.

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