Reviews and Blog Posts: fiction

One Wild and Crazy Guy

Steve Martin

Don't you just love it when you stumble upon a book that you really want to take your time to read? Slowly and mindfully placing yourself in the right frame of mind and chair as you peel each page open with indulgence.

An Object of Beauty, Steve Martin's latest novel, is just that book. Tucked in its pages are color copies of both fine and contemporary art that accompany the story of the central character, Lacey Yeager, a young and ambitious woman who craves to make a name for herself in the art world.  Similar to his previous book, Shopgirl, Martin develops a female character navigating her way towards what she feels is most important.

The Epic Novel

infinite jest

Summer is supposed to be a time of long sunny days and carefree fun. Why in the world would anyone want to bog themselves down with a thousand-plus page novel? A valid question for sure, but I don't think I'm alone in taking on an epic novel this summer.

My poison of choice, David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest, a polarizing brick of a book full of nonsequential chapters, more characters than you can count, and 100 pages of fictional footnotes.

Getting to Happy

It has been 18 years since Terry McMillan has told of the story of Gloria, Savannah, Bernadine and Robin in the novel Waiting to Exhale.

Years later McMillan follows up with the highly anticipated sequel to these ladies lives and friendship.

Getting to Happy, wastes no time telling the reader what these ladies have been up to the last 12 years.

Over the years these four friends have dealt with divorce, death, addiction, raising children as well as trying to find happiness!! McMillan is a master at telling the story of Savannah, Gloria, Bernadine and Robin.

The question is will they all finally find happiness?

Johnny Depp reads to me

Life by Keith Richards

Oh, yes, I've been spending a lot of time with Mr. Depp.

Ok, so I might be stretching the truth just a bit. The truth is I recently began listening to Keith Richards' autobiography, Life, read by Johnny Depp and I don't think there could be a more perfect reader. Depp's droll tone conjures Richards (except Depp is easy to understand!) and when he slips into a British accent it doesn't sound fake (a must for me).

Colorado Author Carol Berg at Schlessman This Sunday!

The Fresh City Life My Branch Colorado Authors Series presents Carol Berg at Schlessman on Sunday, May 22, at 2:00 p.m.

Carol Berg is a former software engineer who can't quite believe her own story. Since her 2000 debut, she's been flown to Israel, taught writing in the U.S., Canada, and Scotland, and answered mail from New Zealand, Kuwait, the slopes of Denali, and beneath the Mediterranean Sea.

If You Liked The Paris Wife by Paula McLain

The Paris Wife by Paula McLain

The Denver Public Library is proud to be partnering with KWGN Channel 2 and other area libraries to facilitate the Everyday Book Club. The Everyday Book Club Selection for April was The Paris Wife by Paula McLain. Book club segments air on Mondays during the Everyday show’s 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. broadcast.

If you loved The Paris Wife (or are still waiting for your copy), you might also like:

Serendipity of Browsing

Sandra visits the Central Library for serendipitous browsing: scouting new authors and reigniting intellectual passions.

Sandra enjoys wandering the stacks at the Central Library on Sundays when her neighborhood branch library is closed and parking is free at the downtown meters. "If anyone ever asks me the most valuable item in my purse," says Sandra, "It's my library card."

City Tales: City Noir

paris noir

This time around our travels take us to the darker side of the city.

Are you ready for the seamier side of your favorite city? The Akashic Books city noir series combines two of my favorite things: noir mysteries and great cities. Each anthology features original stories (by authors such as Lawrence Block, Stewart O'Nan, Pete Hamill and Michael Connelly) set in a "distinct neighborhood or location within the city."

Indian Country Noir

Ode to Japanese Authors

Yukio Mishima

I've always been taken on an interesting journey exploring the terrain of Japanese novels.

Japanese authors offer an array of characters reaching from the subtle layers mist to an ocean of depth and current in character development, so much so the characters become imprinted into our imagination.

Some authors to read:

Colorado Authors Series Presents Eleanor Brown, Author of The Weird Sisters

The Weird Sisters

The Fresh City Life My Branch Colorado Authors Series presents Eleanor Brown, author of The Weird Sisters, on Sunday, May 8 at 2 p.m. at Schlessman.

Eleanor Brown's debut novel, The Weird Sisters, is the story of the Andreas family, whose motto might as well be "There's no problem a library card can't solve." When Rosalind, Bianca, and Cordelia (named after Shakespeare heroines by their professor father) return to their childhood home, ostensibly to care for their ailing mother, but really to lick their wounds and bury their secrets, they are horrified to find the others there. See, they love each other. They just don't happen to like each other very much.

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