Books Blog

A snail, really? Yes!

snail eating

The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, really is about a wild snail eating. But it goes further and deeper than that - Bailey takes us on a literal and researched journey deep into the silence, patience and awed perception of a wild snail eating from her bedside as she recovers from her own illness.

This book was relatable and comforting for me as it explored the different levels of illness. Although a sometimes sad and difficult topic, this story's outlook became a mirror for my life and could for many other people who have experienced the emotional and mental obstacles of overcoming illness.

New Cozy Mysteries

Cookie Dough or Die

Murder can ruin a perfectly good day. The sleuths in these new mystery titles are determined to get on with their lives even if it means solving a crime at the most inopportune time!

The "detectives" in cozy mysteries aren't usually CSI experts but rather everyday people who happen to stumble across dead bodies or have friends who need help. 

Many sleuths become resident experts in their often small communities. And like a really good cookie, one cozy mystery is never enough.

Here are a few, first titles in new mystery series available at the Library:

Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention - Captures the hearts of critics

Manning Marable, the noted History professor at Columbia University and the Founding Director of IRAAS (Institute for Research in African American Studies) at Columbia University, opens the platform for dialogue concerning the life of Malcolm X and his membership in the Nation of Islam.

Recently I read Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, a book written by the late Manning Marable, who unfortunately died days before the book was released.

 

The New England Scene: under the radar writers doing big things

Inferno

Looking for some writers who have gathered a cult following, but may not make it onto your radar? Eileen Myles and Michelle Tea have been at the writing gig for quite some time. Tea is known as the predecessor of Myles and not simply because of their similar Boston backgrounds. They both write frank, honest, and deeply complex considerations of what it means to be female, gay, and a writer. Their upbringings give the backdrop to take ink to paper and write.

Their language picks you apart and asks you to hold up high the raw material they produce. It is no secret that female writers, especially of the obscure variety, remain that, a secret, without hitting it big in the mainstream. If you're looking for your expectations to be fulfilled, Myles and Tea aren't for you. If you're into writers moving towards a liminal space and disregarding censorship and societal norms, Myles and Tea are waiting for you.

Eileen Myles's collection of works include:

In Praise of Connie Willis

Blackout

The 2011 Hugo Award winner for Best Novel happens to be one of my favorite writers, Colorado author Connie Willis.

Many people may see Willis' books in the science fiction section, winning science fiction awards, and immediately think that those books are not for them. I urge you to reconsider.

Ready Player One

Ready Player One

 Have you heard about Ernst Cline's Ready Player One?  Filled with tons of 80s pop culture references, it might be worth doing a bit of extra research to keep up.  We can help.

Set in the near future, Ready Player One is the story of Wade Watts, a poor, orphaned kid whose only escape is entering the vast virtual world of OASIS.  In OASIS, Wade's avatar spends endless hours attempting to solve clues and puzzles in order to find the three keys that will unlock the vast inheritance left by the company's founder, Halliday, who created this hunt as his legacy.  In tribute to his 1980s upbringing, Halliday has loaded the game with all sort of cultural icons and trivia.  Wade and&n

Can obsession last for eternity?

The Taker by Alma Katsu

Can desire withstand immortality?

This is the theme explored by Alma Katsu in her engrossing novel "The Taker." Reminiscent of the earlier writings of Anne Rice, this novel plunges the reader into a dark world of beings cursed with the gift of immortality. This story spans centuries, but in the end it is the depth of characterization that keeps the reader riveted.

If you like your supernatural fiction with complex characters and dark subject matter then take "The Taker" and be prepared to be totally taken in.

Aging isn't easy!

Bird watching has a competitive side worth exploring.

Baby boomers all have retirement plans.  Travel.  Golf.  Relaxation.  Business.  Adventure.  Mystery.

Now that you're retired what do you do with all your time?  You have worked your entire life in order to have the time and money to enjoy yourself.  Have you tired of fishing, scrapbooking and those yoga exercises that eventually get boring.  The library has lots of ideas for you to explore.  And you have the time to explore them now.

THE BIG YEAR by Mark Obmascik
This is bird watching taken to another level.  This is a fervent competition.

 

Change Agents: Bell and Jobs

Derrick Bell

Derrick Bell and Steve Jobs both died on Wednesday but the similarities don't end there. Both men would not be deterred by those who could or would not believe.

Derrick Bell spent his professional life exposing racisim in the legal system and higher education.  He encouraged members of diverse groups to tell their stories as a way of building support and community, something he felt scholarship alone could not do.  

Colorado Authors Series Presents Steve Friesen, Buffalo Bill: A Life of Controversy

Buffalo Bill

Curious about Buffalo Bill, his life, and his Colorado connections? Learn more with Fresh City Life My Branch this week!

Steve Friesen will be at the Bear Valley Branch on Thursday, October 6 at 2:00 p.m. Mr. Friesen will present a slide show and lecture entitled Buffalo Bill: A Life of Controversy, based on his book Buffalo Bill: Scout, Showman, Visionary.

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