You're Welcome Here https://www.denverlibrary.org/ en Alternatives to Calling the Police https://www.denverlibrary.org/blog/library-pro-tips-library-events-youre-welcome-here/jennifer-d/alternatives-calling-police <span>Alternatives to Calling the Police</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/jennifer-d" lang="" about="/users/jennifer-d" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jennifer D</a></span> <span>November 20, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/sites/dplorg/files/2020/11/ev-70EJQdpTry4-unsplash.jpg"><img loading="lazy" src="/sites/dplorg/files/styles/blog_inline/public/2020/11/ev-70EJQdpTry4-unsplash.jpg?itok=wldh3yos" width="200" height="134" alt="Photo by ev on Unsplash, black and white photo of police officers in riot gear" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Written by Amelia Eckles</p> <p>(Content warning: mention of death, police violence.)</p> <p>Elijah McClain, a 23-year-old massage therapist, died after an encounter with Aurora Police in August 2019. McClain was anemic - and wearing a ski mask, something he did even in the summertime because he was often cold. A 911 caller reported this as suspicious behavior, and less than a minute after making contact, police officers put Elijah in a chokehold that restricted blood flow to his brain and rendered him unconscious. He died in the hospital a week later.</p> <p>It may be tempting to call this encounter and the killing of Elijah a tragedy, but it’s important to remember that this is the same police department that brought James Holmes, Century 16 Movie Theater mass murderer, into custody alive. Why would a young man walking home be considered more of a threat than a mass murderer who killed 12 people and injured 70 others?</p> <p>When these instances are taken into consideration with national trends, the data becomes all the more revealing. Police spend, on a national average, about 4% of their time <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/19/upshot/unrest-police-time-violent-crime.html">addressing violent crime</a>; that means the other 96% of the time, they are responding to concerns they are not best suited to address. Furthermore, The American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that <a href="https://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797(16)30384-1/fulltext">20% of deaths</a> due to lethal force by law enforcement involved someone with a mental health condition, and Black people were 2.8 times more likely to be killed by law enforcement than white people, despite being the racial demographic least likely to be armed.</p> <p>Given these realities and the potential for an altercation with the police to escalate, what are you supposed to do? Say you see something that seems suspicious or makes you uncomfortable, but doesn’t pose an immediate threat of violence, what options do you have?</p> <p>Denver Public Library held two virtual panels to answer those questions, and more, earlier this fall. Moderated by the Conflict Center and paneled by representatives from DASHR and The Kaleidoscope Project, as well as a community organizer and an education professional, what follows is compiled from both conversations, to bring awareness to existing resources that serve to build safety for our communities.</p> <p><strong>Support Team Assistance Response: 720-913-STAR (7827)</strong><br /> Earlier this year, a pilot program was launched to handle 911 calls concerning homelessness, mental health, and addiction with the expertise of both a Denver Health paramedic and a Mental Health Center of Denver social worker, rather than police officers. STAR has since answered over 500 calls and has not once needed police back up - in fact, it’s actually <a href="https://www.lx.com/community/a-denver-program-is-trading-police-for-social-workers-on-some-911-calls/21331/">the other way around</a>, where police are requesting help from STAR. The pilot is modeled after a program that’s been in existence for over 30 years in Eugene, Oregon called CAHOOTS (Crisis Assistance Helping Out On the Streets). STAR is currently limited to the downtown area of Denver from 10am-6pm Monday through Friday.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><a href="http://dashrco.org/">Denver Alliance for Street Health Response</a>: 720-432-4086</strong><br /> DASHR is a coalition committed to transforming public safety that helped to get the STAR program off the ground this summer. They provide community tools to navigate crises such as “street medic trainings, overdose response trainings, and restorative practices.”</p> <p><strong><a href="https://coloradocrisisservices.org/">Colorado Crisis Services</a>: 1-844-493-8255&nbsp;</strong><br /> (or text “TALK” to 38255)<br /> Not only does CCS offer a free, 24/7 helpline, they also have multiple walk-in crisis centers throughout the city to provide community members with substance use and mental health services.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://harmreductionactioncenter.org/">Harm Reduction Action Center</a>: 303-572-7800</strong><br /> The HRAC is a resource for working humanely with intravenous substance users. They offer syringe access from 9am-12pm Monday through Friday.</p> <p><a href="https://conflictcenter.org/"><strong>Conflict Center</strong></a><br /> The Conflict Center approaches conflict as an opportunity for learning and connection, rather than something to be avoided. They provide specific classes for adults, youth, parents, and organizations.</p> <p>These programs exist to help us navigate being in a society together--but we all carry a responsibility to make sure we’re taking care of one another. Here’s how you can help:</p> <ul> <li>Save the numbers listed here in your cell phone.</li> <li>Donate to the STAR Program <a href="https://mhcd.org/donate-star-9news/">here</a>.</li> <li>Volunteer with DASHR every Sunday from 8am - 11am. Meet at 20th and Lincoln to provide food and water to folks experiencing homelessness, and talk to business owners about alternatives to the police.</li> <li>Take a class with the Conflict Center to better address conflict in your day-to-day life.</li> <li>Encourage <a href="https://www.denvergov.org/maps/map/councildistricts">local elected officials</a> to spend taxpayer money in an effective, dignifying way.</li> </ul> <p>If you find yourself in a situation where your first instinct is to call 911, pause, try to reflect to understand your discomfort and determine whether a call is necessary - or if another service might be more appropriate.<br /> &nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Additional Resources:</p> <p><a href="https://www.211colorado.org/">211 Colorado</a></strong><br /> Calling 211 will confidentially connect you with services across the state including food pantries, overnight shelters, and more.</p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/denver-311-help-center.html">311 Help Center</a><br /> (if you’re calling outside Denver: 720-913-1311)</strong><br /> Calling 311 will help you navigate city services such as ballot drop off locations, up to date information about COVID-19, online vehicle registration, and more.</p> <p><a href="https://www.nlgcolorado.org/"><strong>National Lawyers Guild: Colorado Chapter</strong></a><br /> The NLG offers legal support when observing police violence.</p> <p><a href="https://dontcallthepolice.com/denver/"><strong>Don’t Call the Police: Denver</strong></a><br /> This website breaks down community-based alternatives to the police by city and by category (ex: LGBTQ, housing, mental health, etc).</p> <p><a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Gm6KRoe1PGJLYGt1fidlyARBF7b23y1G/view"><strong>Steps to Ask Yourself Before Calling the Police Flowchart</strong></a><br /> SURJ Denver provides a list of questions to use to assess situations where you might think to call the police. It includes local resources.</p> <p><a href="https://www.afsc.org/video/webinar-bystander-intervention-and-de-escalation-training"><strong>Bystander Intervention and De-escalation Training: Webinar</strong></a><br /> Provided by the American Friends Service Committee, this training helps attendees to prepare for instances of violence and take action to counter it.</p> <p><strong><em>Beyond Survival: Strategies and Stories from the Transformative Justice Movement</em></strong><br /> Afraid to call 911, but not sure what to do instead? Here are strategies for accountability beyond the criminal justice system.&nbsp;This anthology is <a href="https://catalog.denverlibrary.org/search/title.aspx?ctx=1.1033.0.0.6&amp;pos=2&amp;cn=2122748">available for checkout</a>&nbsp;from Denver Public Library.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> </div> <div class="field field--inline field--name-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field__items"> <span class="field__item"><a href="/category/blog-categories/library-pro-tips" hreflang="en">Library Pro Tips</a>, </span> <span class="field__item"><a href="/category/blog-categories/library-events" hreflang="en">Library Events</a>, </span> <span class="field__item"><a href="/youre-welcome-here/youre-welcome-here" hreflang="en">You&#039;re Welcome Here</a></span> </div> <div class="field field--name-free-tagging field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/category/free-tagging/police" hreflang="en">police</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/category/free-tagging/programs" hreflang="en">programs</a></div> </div> <section> </section> Fri, 20 Nov 2020 15:45:50 +0000 Jennifer D 485181 at https://www.denverlibrary.org Denver Public Library Announces Recipients of 2020 Latino Community Service Awards https://www.denverlibrary.org/blog/cultural-inclusivity-library-news-youre-welcome-here/ogallegos/denver-public-library-announces <span>Denver Public Library Announces Recipients of 2020 Latino Community Service Awards</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/ogallegos" lang="" about="/users/ogallegos" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ogallegos</a></span> <span>September 22, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/sites/dplorg/files/2020/09/Latino%20awards%202020.jpg"><img loading="lazy" src="/sites/dplorg/files/styles/blog_inline/public/2020/09/Latino%20awards%202020.jpg?itok=rj7LBqDE" width="200" height="144" alt="Latino awards 2020 purple graphic" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">The Denver Public Library has announced the recipients of its annual Latino Community Service Awards. The awards honor individuals who have made a deep and lasting impact on our city and state. Each year, the library honors Latino leaders with three awards. Winners are selected by a committee of library commissioners, community members and library staff.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">No public event was held this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Winners will be acknowledged through a social media campaign throughout Hispanic Heritage Month.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:700"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:underline"><span style="-webkit-text-decoration-skip:none"><span style="text-decoration-skip-ink:none">The Lena L. Archuleta Community Service Award: Angela Cobián</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.2"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:italic"><span style="text-decoration:none">The recipient will be a person of Latino descent who has made a positive impact in the Denver community, beyond paid employment, in the field of education, youth development, early childhood programming or education policy.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Angela Cobián is a first-generation Mexican-American and a first generation college graduate. Ms. Cobián graduated from Colorado College in 2011. During this time she earned the Fred Sonderman Award in Political Science and membership in the Pi Gamma Mu Honors Society.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Following college, Ms. Cobián returned to Denver to teach Literacy for English Language Acquisition-Spanish students in the second and third grade, she also earned a Masters in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado-Denver. In 2013, she was awarded a Fulbright scholarship to consult with Ensena por Mexico on program development for student-led social change initiatives and to teach English at the National Pedagogical University in Mexico City.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Upon her return from Mexico, Cobián was a Bilingual Community Organizer with Together Colorado, an affiliate of the PICO National Network. She co-led school and congregation-based organizations alongside parents and parishioners addressing immigration and education issues. She continues her work in collective action today as the Director of National Organizing and Development with Leadership for Educational Equity (LEE). The Denver Foundation awarded her the Swanee Hunt Emerging Leader Award in 2017 in recognition of her community work.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Ms. Cobián currently represents District 2 on the Denver Public Schools (DPS) Board of Education. She also serves as Treasurer and Chairperson of the Finance and Audit Committee, and co-led the 2020-21 budget process and COVID-19 response with the DPS Chief Financial Officer.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Ms. Cobián is not only a voice for her constituents, she has used her organizing skills to activate her constituents to be involved in education and elevated their voices in the Denver Public Schools decision-making process.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:700"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:underline"><span style="-webkit-text-decoration-skip:none"><span style="text-decoration-skip-ink:none">Eric J. Duran Community Service Award: Jesse Ogas</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.2"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:italic"><span style="text-decoration:none">The recipient will be a person of Latino descent who has made a positive impact in the Denver community, beyond paid employment, to advance community development and/or cultural life through their involvement with the Denver Public Library or another civic institution.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Jesse Ogas was born and raised in Santa Clara, New Mexico. Mr. Ogas has championed the struggles for children who have experienced sexual and mental abuse. He tells of his own story with sexual abuse and how he was able to heal and become a productive citizen and family man. He spoke to the legislature about his personal and painful experience during a session regarding Sexual Assault on Children. He has also taken on a quest to reach those on the autism spectrum to attain their full potential.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">As the director of Firefly Autism, he goes beyond the expectation of the Board to reach out to monolingual Spanish speaking children and their families. This population has been sorely underrepresented in therapeutic care. In his volunteer endeavors with Clinica Tepeyac and the President's Community Cabinet at Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU), he purposely ties in the resources of these organizations to the needs of children on the spectrum, creating a wider sphere of care. For example, he is working with MSU faculty to create a program for MSU students who wish to major in the behavioral sciences specifically for children with autism.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Jesse has embraced diversity and equity in his work, volunteer and personal life. As a member of Su Teatro, Jesse has a platform to tell our story, our traditions. He is very intentional in representing himself as a gay Latino with pride and conviction. In addition to his role at Firefly Autism, Jesse also currently serves as a board member of NewEd, Clinica Tepeyac, Escuela Tlatelolco, and the Mental Health Center of Denver.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:700"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:underline"><span style="-webkit-text-decoration-skip:none"><span style="text-decoration-skip-ink:none">The César Chávez Latino Leadership Hall of Fame Award: Emanuel Martinez &amp; Guadalupe “Lupe” Briseño</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:italic"><span style="text-decoration:none">The award, presented annually, will celebrate the induction of one individual into the César Chávez Leadership Hall of Fame. The recipient will be a Coloradan of Latino descent who is committed to social justice and has made a significant positive impact in their community through community organizing, direct service and/or advocacy and public policy.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:700"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:underline"><span style="-webkit-text-decoration-skip:none"><span style="text-decoration-skip-ink:none">Emanuel Martinez</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.2"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Emanuel Martinez was born in Denver, Colorado in 1947. Mr. Martinez began his career as an artist at the age of 13, when he painted his first mural. He was just 16 when he became an activist by joining Los Voluntarios, a political organization headed by Rudolfo "Corky” Gonzales.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">In 1966, Martinez was one of the incorporators of the Crusade for Justice Civil Rights organization and met César Chávez&nbsp; at the union hall in Denver. At this event Emanuel had his first art exhibit and presented Chávez&nbsp; with a painting. Chávez&nbsp; invited him to go to Delano, CA to work as an artist for the United Farmworkers Organization. Emanuel was paid five dollars a week. At the age of 20, he created the "Farmworkers Altar" in Los Angeles for the 1968 event where Chávez&nbsp; broke his 25 day fast. This altar and another one of Martinez’s pieces are now in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of American Art in Washington, D.C. That same year, Emanuel volunteered his time to the Poor People's Campaign in Washington D.C. as a staff member for the Southern Christian Leadership conference (SCLC), and art director at the Crusade For Justice cultural center.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Since 1965, Emanuel has been committed to the Chicano/Latino struggle for justice in the United States. He has donated his time and his artwork to numerous Latino organizations for decades. At 72, he continues to work with incarcerated youth through the Emanuel Project, a non profit organization started in 2011, where his achievements include 50 murals in facilities in 14 different states.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">As a muralist, painter and sculptor, Martinez occupies an outstanding status among nationally known artists. Since establishing a studio in 1968, Martinez has received international acclaim and prestigious awards for his design capabilities and high standards of workmanship.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Some of his awards include the 1985 Governor's Award for Excellence in the Arts, 1995 Mayor's Award for Excellence in the Arts, 2001 Civil Rights Award presented by NEWSED, and he was inducted into the Colorado Latino Hall of Fame in 2018. Throughout his lengthy career he has volunteered his service for numerous Chicano organizations, committees and boards.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:700"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:underline"><span style="-webkit-text-decoration-skip:none"><span style="text-decoration-skip-ink:none">Guadalupe “Lupe” Briseño</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.2"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Guadalupe “Lupe” Briseño was born in Texas and began her working life&nbsp; as a migrant laborer. Mrs. Briseño eventually settled in Colorado. In 1968, she began working at the Kitayama Carnation Farm where she experienced deplorable working conditions. She organized the primarily Latina workforce at the floral farm in Brighton, Colorado to form the National Florist Workers Organization to demand better working conditions, medical coverage and higher wages.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">As the organizer of the Kitayama Carnation Strike, Lupe Briseño demonstrated the effectiveness of Latina leadership in Colorado’s Labor Movement and set the stage for the Colorado Chicano Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and 1970s. Her story is an important chapter in the history of Colorado, the evolution of Latina feminist leadership and the struggle for Chicano Civil Rights.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Lupe's work as a labor and union organizer has been recognized by the Colorado Women's Hall of Fame, where she was inducted in 2019. Her role in history has inspired a play by Su Teatro and she is a central figure in the Year of La Chicana exhibit at History Colorado as well as&nbsp; in the history of women in the labor movement at the Byers Evans House. Her role in Latino history in Colorado is also documented in articles by academic researcher Dr. Priscilla Falcón.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Additionally, we would like to recognize and honor the women who supported Lupe’s&nbsp;efforts—Lupe Briseño and the Strong Women of Brighton</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li style="list-style-type:disc"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Martha del Real</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="list-style-type:disc"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Mary Padilla</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="list-style-type:disc"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Mary Sailas</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="list-style-type:disc"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Rachel Sandoval</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <div class="field field--inline field--name-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field__items"> <span class="field__item"><a href="/category/blog-categories/cultural-inclusivity" hreflang="en">Cultural Inclusivity</a>, </span> <span class="field__item"><a href="/category/blog-categories/library-news" hreflang="en">Library News</a>, </span> <span class="field__item"><a href="/youre-welcome-here/youre-welcome-here" hreflang="en">You&#039;re Welcome Here</a></span> </div> <div class="field field--name-free-tagging field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/category/free-tagging/hispanic-heritage-month" hreflang="en">Hispanic Heritage Month</a></div> </div> <section> </section> Tue, 22 Sep 2020 21:58:24 +0000 ogallegos 430860 at https://www.denverlibrary.org Explore the Wonders of Personalized Service https://www.denverlibrary.org/blog/library-news-youre-welcome-youre-welcome-here/sspitsna/explore-wonders-personalized-service <span>Explore the Wonders of Personalized Service</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/sherry" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sspitsna</span></span> <span>September 15, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/sites/dplorg/files/2020/08/prl.jpg"><img loading="lazy" src="/sites/dplorg/files/styles/blog_inline/public/2020/08/prl.jpg?itok=s981H9fL" width="200" height="122" alt="Photo of a laptop next to a stack of books" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-multiple-images field--type-image field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"> <a href="/sites/dplorg/files/2020/09/logoNOVPLg_0.jpg"><img loading="lazy" src="/sites/dplorg/files/styles/blog_inline/public/2020/09/logoNOVPLg_0.jpg?itok=iqULBcdf" width="184" height="107" alt="NoveList logo" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Readers are as unique as the books available to them at the Denver Public Library. But often, selecting books for yourself, or your children, can be daunting, especially now, when you cannot visit and browse for yourself. Whether open or closed, Denver Public Library has developed a team of dedicated staff, called Readers’ Advisors, who expertly pair readers with selections from DPL’s collection to take the stress out of making a perfect pick.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>The process is simple--submit an online personalized reading list request, and advisors use your preferences to produce an age-appropriate list of titles to match your reading or listening needs. But while the process is simple, the magic is in the thought and preparation that goes into each customer’s personalized list.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Readers’ Advisors utilize a toolkit that includes the <a href="https://denverlibrary.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.asp?profile=novplus">NoveList Plus database</a> (available to you with a DPL library card), in-house training, professional reviews and bookseller newsletters to make recommendations. But, advisors also employ detailed considerations based on what customers share in their like and dislike categories- things like what kinds of characters or settings interest them, what genres might be complementary to those they already like, and what formats might work best for the customer (eBooks, audiobooks, etc.). The rest, the real art, comes from readers’ advisors’ cumulative experience reading, listening to, watching and absorbing what is happening in the publishing world and being able to translate that into meaningful and thoughtful recommendations.&nbsp;</p> <p>Filling out the <a href="https://www.denverlibrary.org/reads">PRL form</a>&nbsp;may seem more suited to a machine algorithm than a person, which delights many of our customers. “I was so surprised and happy to find a thorough response (written by a human no less!) to my request,” responded an energized reader. Caregivers looking for help finding great books that match their young readers interests and reading level are grateful for the service as well. “This list is amazing! I love all of these book recommendations, with no repeats from anything my daughter is currently reading. Love this service!”</p> <p>&nbsp;Sometimes suggested titles may nudge customers in new directions, whether that means offering a graphic novel to someone who has always listened to audio, or finding an exciting chapter book for a fourth grader who only likes picture books. Or a response could encourage a reader to get deeper into DPL’s collection, as one requester wrote: “Your staff has recommended titles that I would never have picked up.&nbsp;&nbsp;Books that taught me a lot about remote places and people experiencing life struggles.”</p> <p>Personalized reading lists help DPL fulfill its mission to welcome customers and help them explore and connect, providing an experience with a librarian in an online environment. This service has grown steadily in popularity, with advisors completing 871 adult requests and 426 childrens and young adult requests in 2019, recommending thousands of titles to requesters in English and Spanish. We're looking to double those numbers in 2020!</p> <p>During the COVID-19 closure, it is even more important to be able to connect with customers, and to connect customers to engaging materials in DPL’s collection. With a turnaround time of less than a week, and direct links to the library catalog provided, the personalized reading list service is uniquely positioned to serve customers of all ages, at any time. <a href="https://www.denverlibrary.org/blog/books-library-news/dodie/we-think-you-need-some-personalized-service-right-now">Request a list today</a>&nbsp;and see how readers’ advisors can guide you to reading and listening experiences selected specifically for you.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <div class="field field--inline field--name-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field__items"> <span class="field__item"><a href="/youre-welcome-here/youre-welcome-here" hreflang="en">You&#039;re Welcome Here</a></span> </div> <section> </section> Tue, 15 Sep 2020 15:11:19 +0000 sspitsna 407616 at https://www.denverlibrary.org The Joy of Craft Time https://www.denverlibrary.org/blog/library-news-youre-welcome-youre-welcome-here/sspitsna/joy-craft-time <span>The Joy of Craft Time</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/sherry" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sspitsna</span></span> <span>September 8, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/sites/dplorg/files/2020/08/DIY%20KIDS.jpg"><img loading="lazy" src="/sites/dplorg/files/styles/blog_inline/public/2020/08/DIY%20KIDS.jpg?itok=cGIHaVfX" width="200" height="267" alt="Photo of two children making crafts" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>With the COVID-19 public health crisis closing everything from libraries to businesses to schools and camps, many people are now faced with a new reality- being a caregiver in a new, shelter-in-place environment. For parents, it can feel like we're suddenly expected to be experts in things we don't necessarily have any experience with: we're now teachers, full-time entertainers, and IT support for small children. For those of you feeling this pressure, consider the joy of craft time.</p> <p>Some people may find doing arts and crafts with children as intimidating as explaining the difference between numbers and digits, but there is a magic phrase that can change your perspective and help you enjoy this activity for the first time and every time after that: process over product.</p> <p>There are what seems like an infinite number of craft and art projects for kids on the internet: make a bean bag toss game or a cardboard robot or a macaroni galaxy or your five millionth batch of slime! These are all fun projects, but the instructions, with their photos of impossibly well-groomed children creating instagram-worthy crafts leave the adults feeling less "expert" when projects fail to live up to internet standards. A focus solely on a product implies there will be a right way and a wrong way to make something.</p> <p>Reframing craft time to focus on process means talking about materials, about tools, and about possibilities. It isn't abandoning a product - they aren't opposites, and something is still getting created - but it is being open to letting the product be determined by what you learn along the way. It means laying whatever you find in the house out on a table and asking "I wonder if..." It means starting with a question, letting the learners direct the exploration, and seeing what you find along the way. It means becoming a learner alongside the young people in your house, creating a space where it's okay for everyone to make mistakes - a space we rarely get to inhabit.&nbsp;</p> <p>At my house, we've assembled a box with all of our most useful tools - a low-temp hot glue gun, scissors, markers, some nuts and bolts, tape - and I'll encourage my kids to pick a single material from the pile and see what they can make. We'll talk about what they were doing before, if there was a problem they wish they could solve or some prop that would have made their play more fun. That has led to things like a camera stand made of popsicle sticks, a workbench made from scrap wood and felt Wonder Woman tiaras. The best part, as a parent, was creating a less stressful environment and experiencing the joy of watching my kids explore their own projects.</p> <p>If you'd like some inspiration, try searching for "process art" or "tinkering" and you'll find great suggestions, but the greatest guides you'll find are the young people right in your house. </p> <!--When your children have a project they are proud of, please share it with everyone by entering it in the Denver Public Library Maker Challenge. Participants upload a picture, video, or sound recording with a short description of their project to https://denverlibraryadventures.org/ and will then be entered into a drawing for gift cards from local businesses. Keep creating and having fun- we look forward to seeing what you make!--></p> </div> <div class="field field--inline field--name-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field__items"> <span class="field__item"><a href="/youre-welcome-here/youre-welcome-here" hreflang="en">You&#039;re Welcome Here</a></span> </div> <section> </section> Tue, 08 Sep 2020 16:29:41 +0000 sspitsna 401789 at https://www.denverlibrary.org A DPL Day https://www.denverlibrary.org/blog/library-news-youre-welcome-youre-welcome-here/sspitsna/dpl-day <span>A DPL Day</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/sherry" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sspitsna</span></span> <span>September 1, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/sites/dplorg/files/2020/08/CEN.jpg"><img loading="lazy" src="/sites/dplorg/files/styles/blog_inline/public/2020/08/CEN.jpg?itok=6sCwZESW" width="200" height="200" alt="Photo of Denver Central Library" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>As you wake up this morning, you take in the bright Colorado sunlight streaming through a nearby window. You stretch languidly and set your intentions for the day for relaxation and exploration. Luckily, you have a <a href="https://www.denverlibrary.org/library-card">Denver Public Library card</a>!</p> <!--<p><p>As your day begins and you prepare your breakfast, you decide to stream an album from <a href="https://volumedenver.org/">VOLUME Denver</a>, a local music project. Streaming local music reminds you of your favorite nights in darkly lit music venues when you stayed up way too late.</p> <ul> <li>If you decide to make biscuits and gravy, listen to Odessa Rose</li> <li>If you decide to make waffles and bacon, listen to Automatic Iris</li> </ul> <p>--></p> <p>With breakfast consumed, you look out the front window and decide to get some fresh air. You grab your face mask, hand sanitizer and headphones to listen to a <a href="https://denver.overdrive.com/">downloadable audiobook</a> as you stroll, and head out the front door.</p> <ul> <li>If you decide on a long walk, listen to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling (it’s currently available with no wait!)</li> <li>For a shorter walk, listen to Aimless Love: A Collection of Poems by Billy Collins.</li> </ul> <p>As you arrive home, you yearn for a good book, and feel the familiar stab of anxiety at wading through all the books in the world. Luckily, you remember that the library provides a number of speciality services that might help.</p> <ul> <li>If you decide to request a <a href="https://www.denverlibrary.org/reads">Personalized Reading List</a>, be sure to also check out an <a href="https://www.denverlibrary.org/dpl-book-clubs">online book club</a>!</li> </ul> <p>As you ease into your afternoon, you seek mental stimulation to keep your skills sharp and help earn the nap you see in the not-too-distant future.&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>Want to try learning a new language? Pick one of the 70 languages that <a href="https://www.denverlibrary.org/blog/books-research/stacey/learn-language-mango">Mango Languages</a>&nbsp;has to offer.</li> <li>If you choose to explore local history, pick one of the many tediously researched and engagingly written <a href="https://history.denverlibrary.org/">Western History and Genealogy</a> blogs.</li> </ul> <p>After you arise from your well earned nap, you find yourself hungry again. Is it already time for dinner?&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>If you feel like cooking, try a recipe from an <a href="https://www.rbdigital.com/denverco/service/magazines/landing?">online magazine</a>.</li> <li>Thinking delivery instead? Place your order, then scroll through the library’s vast <a href="https://digital.denverlibrary.org/">digital collection of photos, maps and more</a> while you wait.</li> </ul> <p>With a full belly and a desire to kick back and relax, your mind goes to something entertaining. Maybe a comedy film from <a href="https://denverlibrary.kanopy.com/">Kanopy</a>? Or, perhaps checking out an <a href="https://denver.overdrive.com/search?query=mindfulness">ebook&nbsp;on mindfulness techniques</a> could guide you to a restful sleep.&nbsp;</p> <p>As you turn in for the night, you are reminded just how many ways you can read, learn and explore throughout the day, using only your <a href="https://www.denverlibrary.org/library-card">Denver Public Library card</a>. So now the only question is...what to do tomorrow?</p> </div> <div class="field field--inline field--name-blog-categories field--type-entity-reference field__items"> <span class="field__item"><a href="/category/blog-categories/library-news" hreflang="en">Library News</a>, </span> <span class="field__item"><a href="/youre-welcome-here" hreflang="en">You&#039;re welcome to</a>, </span> <span class="field__item"><a href="/youre-welcome-here/youre-welcome-here" hreflang="en">You&#039;re Welcome Here</a></span> </div> <section> </section> Tue, 01 Sep 2020 13:40:56 +0000 sspitsna 407587 at https://www.denverlibrary.org