Great Nonfiction Books for Tweens

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Atkins, Laura, author.
Beals, Melba, author.

A member of the Little Rock Nine shares her memories of growing up in the South under Jim Crow.

Carmichael, L. E. (Lindsey E.), author.

"The boreal forest is our planet's largest land biome. A scarf around the neck of the world, it spans a dozen countries, from Canada to the mountain peaks of Japan. Parts of the biome are so remote, few humans have ever seen them. But the forest plays a vital role on our planet. It is home to an incredible diversity of species. Its trees clean our air, and its wetlands clean our water. Known as a "carbon sink," the biome plays an important role in slowing global climate change. These are just a few reasons why the boreal forest is worth appreciating -- and protecting. In this beautifully written book, award-winning author L. E. Carmichael takes us on an year-long journey through this vast and vital wilderness. The lyrical fictional narrative tells of the species that live in the forest, paired with informational sidebars that expand on key concepts and provide further context. We also learn about the forest's geography and history, the significant role it plays in regulating the planet's climate and the water cycle that connects the forest all around the world. Additional material in the end matter includes a world map of the boreal forest, information about the water cycle and carbon cycle, a glossary, author's sources, resources for kids and an index. Artwork by award-winning children's illustrator JoseĢe Bisaillon provides a rare glimpse into life in the biome. Expertly researched, and written in consultation with Indigenous peoples who live in the boreal forest, Boreal is an exploration of one of the most beautiful places on Earth."-- Provided by publisher.

Castaldo, Nancy F. (Nancy Fusco), 1962- author.

Back from the Brink answers these questions and more as it delves into the threats to seven species, and the scientific and political efforts to coax them back from the brink of extinction. This rich, informational look at the problem of extinction has a hopeful tone: all of these animals' numbers are now on the rise.

Dionne, Evette, author.

"For African American women, the fight for the right to vote was only one battle. An eye-opening book that tells the important, overlooked story of black women as a force in the suffrage movement--when fellow suffragists did not accept them as equal partners in the struggle."--Publisher's description.

Dunbar, Erica Armstrong, author.

"A National Book Award Finalist for Non-Fiction, Never Caught is the eye-opening narrative of Ona Judge, George and Martha Washington's runaway slave, who risked everything for freedom. Now in a Young Readers Edition"-- Provided by publisher.

Favreau, Marc, 1968- author.

"Marc Favreau documents the Great Depression--a time when Americans from all walks of life fell victim to poverty, insecurity, and fear--and tells the incredible story of how they survived and, ultimately, thrived. This is the story of the Great Depression in the United States, from the sweeping consequences of the market collapse to the more personal stories of individuals and communities caught up in the aftermath. Packed with photographs, primary source documents, and firsthand accounts, Crash shines a spotlight on pivotal moments and figures across ethnic, gender, racial, social, and geographic divides, reflecting many different experiences of one of the most turbulent periods in American history. Discover what life was like for historical figures and everyday Americans as the country went from the highs of the roaring 20s to the lows of the Great Depression and back to booming in the 1940s"-- Provided by publisher.

Gray Smith, Monique, 1968- author.

"This nonfiction book examines how we can foster reconciliation with Indigenous people at individual, family, community and national levels"-- Provided by publisher.

Naujokaitis, Pranas T., author, illustrator.

"In History Comics: The Challenger Disaster, we turn the clock back to January 28, 1986. Seven astronauts boarded the space shuttle Challenger on what would be a routine mission. All eyes and cameras were on crew member Christa McAuliffe, a high school teacher, who was set to become the first private citizen in space. Excitement filled the air as the clock counted down to liftoff. But at T-plus seventy-three seconds after launch, the unthinkable happened... What caused the midair explosion? In Pranas T. Naujokaitis's imaginative tale, set in a far-off future, a group of curious kids investigate the hard questions surrounding the Challenger explosion. Inspired by the legacy and sacrifice of the Challenger seven, they continue in their footsteps, setting out toward the stars and into the great unknown!" -- Amazon.com.

Reynolds, Jason, author.

"A history of racist and antiracist ideas in America, from their roots in Europe until today, adapted from the National Book Award winner Stamped from the Beginning"-- Provided by publisher.

Rubin, Susan Goldman, author.

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. is one of the most famous memorials in the world. But most people are not as familiar with the college student who won the design competition to build it. This carefully researched volume chronicles Maya Lin's childhood, her battle to create the memorial as she envisioned it, and the incredible body of work she has produced since then. More than simply an art book, this compelling biography of a young woman who became a visionary artist and activist is also a timely celebration of the role of women and minorities in American society--past, present, and future"-- Provided by publisher.

Thimmesh, Catherine, author.

From the Sibert medal winning author of TEAM MOON and the bestselling GIRLS THINK OF EVERYTHING comes a riveting, timely account of panda conservation efforts in China, perfect for budding environmentalists and activists.

Treuer, Anton, author.

A "book of questions and answers for Native and non-Native young readers alike. Ranging from 'Why is there such a fuss about nonnative people wearing Indian costumes for Halloween?' to 'Why is it called a traditional Indian fry bread taco?' to 'What's it like for Natives who don't look Native?' to 'Why are Indians so often imagined rather than understood?' and beyond, [this book] does exactly what its title says for young readers"--Publisher marketing.

Yellowhorn, Eldon, 1956- author.

Discover the amazing story of the Indigenous peoples of the Americas from the end of the Ice Age to the arrival of the Europeans. You'll learn what people ate, how they expressed themselves through art, and how they adapted to the land. Archaeologists have been able to piece together what life may have been like pre-contact-- and how life changed with the arrival of the Europeans.

Summaries provided by DPL's catalog unless otherwise noted. Click on each title to view more information.