Reviews and Blog Posts: science

Fun Times in Fatherhood

Darth Vader and Son

Being a father can be tough, but it can also be a lot of fun. All of the sudden you can build forts, spend hours playing with Legos, and run around the backyard screaming like a pirate without people shaking their heads in disgust. As Father's Day is upon us, here are some great books that will make fathers smile and help them up their game.


Cold, Colder, Coldest


During the colder months, some folks like to read about tropical climates and warm days. I have a tendency to want to read about places that are even colder than where I am.

Enter my obsession over books about Antarctica. I don't know that I'll ever get to visit there, but I do love to read about it, both in fiction and nonfiction. While there is a vast body of literature about Antarctic explorers such as Amundsen, Shackleton, and Scott, my reading about the cold continent tends to be about modern folks--scientists and other curious types--who have recorded their time there and are often studying the (few) animals that live there, along with other studies including climate change, the earth's history, and even the possibilities of life on Mars.

Science ink : tattoos of the science obsessed

by Carl Zimmer

Reviewer Rating:

I came across this book by chance when pulling up a complete list of Mary Roach's titles for someone (she writes the introduction, and if you like science and haven't read her books, check her out!). Science Ink takes something simple--scientists and their tattoos, and packages it to be entertaining...

Rabid for Rabid

Rabid: A Cultural History of the World's Most Diabolical Virus

55,000 people die in agony from this virus every year.

I'm talking rabies, people. I assumed (incorrectly) that this virus was mostly extinct. Rabies is very much alive and well - thanks to a lack of vaccines and treatment in some parts of the world. As a bleeding heart who is likely to try to help any injured animal that crosses my path, I decided to do a bit of research to see exactly how prevalent rabies is in Colorado. The Colorado Department of Natural Resources has some very accessible information, in case you're interested.

When Did Humans First Enter the Americas?

Join Fresh City Life My Branch and Feed Your Mind with the question of when humans first came to the Americas on Monday, September 10 at 6:30 p.m. at the Schlessman Family Branch.

Dr. Steven Holen, Curator of Archaeology at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science has focused much of his research on this question, one of the most hotly debated topics in North American archaeology. After 130 years of scientists asking this question, we still do not have a definitive answer, although we are making progress in finding older and older human sites. Dr.

Be Social! Grill It! Sniff It!

What does your weekend look like? Add a Fresh City Life My Branch program to the picture to make it look fun!

Events on Saturday, August 25:

Social Networking 101, 10 a.m. at the Bear Valley Branch. What's all the hype about Facebook? Do you want to know what tweeting is? Learn what a social network is, why people do and don't use them, check out the latest examples, and learn how to get started if you want to!

The violinist's thumb : and other lost tales of love, war, and genius, as written by our genetic code

by Sam Kean

Reviewer Rating:

What do you know about DNA? Want to know more? Be entertained while you learn and pick up this book! Kean covers everything from how DNA works and how scientists sequence it to the many controversies studying DNA has contributed to. Do cat hoarders have altered DNA that compels them...

The age of miracles : a novel

by Karen Thompson Walker

Reviewer Rating:

A slowly-unfolding story of the earth's days lengthening told by an 11 year old girl. This is not the in-your-face apocalypse novel that I've become accustomed to. It's really the story of growing up and learning about the frailties of relationships and social constructs in the midst of a time...

New Databases: P.O.V, Science, History, Small Engine Repair, Consumer Health

Research databases from Ebsco

As part of a statewide shared library package, we’re introducing new databases. As a result of the shared plan, the cost is no more than it has been in the past.


Points of View
Small Engine Repair Reference Center

Consumer Health Complete
History Reference Center
Legal Information Reference Center

Curious about the World Around You?

The Demon Haunted World

Are you curious about the world around you? If so, here are some books to spark your curiousity. Hopefully, these books will help you learn something new about the world around you.

Carl Sagan was one of the greatest astronomers and published over 600 scientific articles. In his book The Demon Haunted World, Sagan shows us how scientific thinking can help us determine what is true and what is not. If you are curious about whether or not acupuncture and other alternative medicines really work, this is the book for you!

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