Reviews and Blog Posts: Science Fiction

It's That Time of the Year...

If You Could Be Mine

Yes, everyone from The New York Times to NPR is coming out with their take on "the best books of 2013" right now.

I won't promise this list is "the best," but they're all books I enjoyed this year for various reasons. Please add your own favorite 2013 reads in the comments!! I hope some of my fabulous DPL colleagues will post their own lists, too--we're a diverse group with varying interests and tastes in books.

Science Fiction & Horror:

Doctor Sleep by Stephen King--Classic King. Well-drawn characters, good vs. evil, creepy villains. And a Colorado conection!

3:59

by Gretchen McNeil

Reviewer Rating:
4

3:59 is the time it happens.  Every day at 3:59 a.m. and again at 3:59 p.m. Josie gets a glimpse into Jo’s world.  Josie and Jo live in parallel universes.  In many ways their lives are the same.  They look identical.  They live in the same town, go to the...

Parasite

by Mira Grant

In a kickoff to a new series, Grant (author of the Newsflesh trilogy, which I loved) introduces us to a near future world where health care as we know it has been fundamentally changed by a company called Symbogen. They developed a genetically modified tapeworm (really) that folks take in...

Life after life : a novel

by Kate Atkinson

Reviewer Rating:
3

1910, England on a snowy night Ursula Todd is born and dies before taking her first breath. Ursula is born on a snowy night in 1910 England and she lives. As Ursula grows up, she also dies repeatedly in a variety of ways. She lives again and again trying to...

Dawn

by Octavia E Butler

Reviewer Rating:
4

Wow--I'm so glad this book was recommended to me--I'd heard of many of Butler's other novels, but not this one. The Earth has been mostly destroyed by nuclear war. Lilith Iyapo wakes up 250 years later to find that she, and other surviving humans, have been saved by an alien...

Brilliance

by Marcus Sakey

Gifteds. Brilliants. Abnorms. Twists. Whatever you call them, they've changed the world. True genius used to come once in a generation. Now, 1 in 100 children are born extraordinarily gifted in various ways--reading body language, tactics, medicine, numbers. Though a small minority of the population, the "normals" feel threatened by...

Star Wars Reads Week is Coming!

Star Wars Reads

This will be a day long remembered. Make that a week! Join us September 30-October 6 for Star Wars Reads Week at Denver Public Library!

Last fall, libraries and bookstores all over the country came together for a celebration of reading and all things Star Wars. The Park Hill Branch Library hosted a standing-room only event featuring all sorts of fun games and activities for Star Wars fans young and old.

Cain's blood : a novel

by Geoffrey Girard

Reviewer Rating:
4

If you like government conspiracies, serial killer stories, science, and thrills, this is a book you might want to take a look at. The government has defense contractors cloning some of the most infamous serial killers in history--Son of Sam, Dahmer, Bundy and more. They say they're working on a...

Hugo Award Winners 2013

Redshirts by John Scalzi

On Sunday night in San Antonio, Redshirts: A Novel with Three Codas by John Scalzi, was awarded the Hugo Award for Best Novel.

Named for Hugo Gernsback, widely credited for popularizing the reading of Science Fiction, The Hugo Awards are one of Science Fiction's most prestigious honors and have been an annual literary event since 1955.

More Hugo Award 2013 Winners:

Best Novella

Best Novelette

Strong Women in Sci-Fi and Fantasy-- now with clothes!

adrienne sati from the thief's covenant. she's probably up to something.

I think it’s relatively easy to think of really amazing sci-fi and fantasy off the top of your head if you read it at all. However, finding sci-fi and fantasy with strong women in it gets a little more difficult, and finding female protagonists that interact with other women and exist as beings unto themselves gets harder.

When I set the challenge to find sci-fi and fantasy that featured women who weren’t fan service, sidekicks, or the only woman in the book, I thought it would be relatively easy and definitely fun to research. After all, sci-fi and fantasy are making a comeback and there are so many great new books published every year. What we found instead is that even now it’s hard to find books written about women who exist as actual people. It’s easier in Teen fiction, but I think there’s more of a push and purpose in that area to make sure that young women and girls have people to look up to.

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