Reviews and Blog Posts: history

The printed square : vintage handkerchief patterns for fashion and design

by Nicky Albrechtsen

Reviewer Rating:
4

The Romans and Egyptians used handkerchiefs but it wasn't until the 20th century that every day folk were able to afford them. So popular was the concept that Kimberly-Clark launched disposable tissues in 1923. The War however limited the use of paper so traditional handkerchiefs made a come back and...

Wraith

by Joe Hill

Reviewer Rating:
3

Did you like NOS4A2? Like horror comics? If the answer to either of these questions is yes, give Wraith a shot. Joe Hill moves between the worlds of traditional books and graphic novels quite a lot, and here he connects them. Wraith tells the story of Charlie Manx, the ominous...

Kilt Tease

http://screencrush.com/starz-outlander-tv-series-trailer-photos/

Planning an Outlander party to swoon with other fans? ​

Guid gear comes in sma' bulk!

Good things come in small packages and your wee library card connects you to the World. Checkout the following resources to create a party worthy of the Scottish Highlands, even if you haven't read all eight books in the series!

October is for (Biography) Lovers

Isabella: The Warrior Queen

What is it about biographies and memoirs? Is it the thrill of finding out intimate information about someone we only know through a public face? The inspiration we get from stories of overcoming obstacles? Learning more about someone when all you really know is that you respect their work? Biographies are perpetually popular at the library, and we are always getting new ones in, but it seems that October is the month that all biography lovers are waiting for.

Yesterday Today

cover image, The Harlem Hellfighters

Anytime is the right time to explore history. The 100th anniversary of “the greatest war” evokes cries from ghostly trenches. An assassination may have sparked World War I but a blueprint for conflict existed long before the first shot. This war gave us shell shock, machine guns, and "a lost generation."

Stamp of Approval

USPS Harvey Milk

If you are a philatelist or new to stamp collecting, the unveiling of a commemorative stamp by the United States Postal Service (USPS) is a major event! The latest stamp honoring Harvey Milk, the first openly Gay elected official, is no exception.

Edison and the rise of innovation

by Leonard DeGraaf

Reviewer Rating:
4

Written by Leonard DeGraaf, archivist of the Thomas Edison National Historic Park, this heavily illustrated biography is academic enough to give the reader a good taste of who Edison was and what his amazing accomplishments were. The historic photographs and artifacts help enhance this story. DeGraaf also takes some time...

White fire

by Douglas J Preston

Reviewer Rating:
4

The latest of the FBI Agent Pendergast series by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child in which the authors take on an old mining story and combine it with current crimes being committed in Roaring Fork, Colorado, a very wealthy ski resort.  The authors are not very subtle in their description...

Outstanding Books for the College Bound and Lifelong Learners

The Night Circus

Every five years, the Young Adult Library Services Association creates a list of Outstanding Books for the College Bound and Lifelong Learners in collaboration with academic librarians.

Whether you are a high school student thinking of heading off to college soon, an adult considering returning to school, or at any stage in your life and wanting some direction in your continuing education, the 2014 list is a diverse group of books, nonfiction and fiction, in various categories, that will expand your thoughts about the world around you. The books are at different reading levels and in different formats, and there's something here that should both interest and challenge nearly anyone interested in feeding their mind.

How the Irish saved civilization

by Thomas Cahill

Reviewer Rating:
2

I wanted to like this book. I had heard good things, but apparently I have been spoiled by modern narrative non-fiction. Cahill runs through pre-medieval history, spending FAR too much time on Rome and Greece (1/3 of the book), in strict chronological order and never really weaving a story, or...

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