Chris's blog

The Subtleties of Hyperbole

Hyperbolic crochet sculpture created by Chris Loffelmacher

This blog about Fresh City Life's newest  obsession, hyperbolic crochet, is genius and will likely be nominated for a Pulitzer Prize! Is this an example of hyperbole or overweening ego? Yes.

It seems fitting that a fibers technique so extravagant and exaggerated as this would carry the name hyperbolic crochet. The name is based not only on the over-the-top quality of these sculptures, but also the hyperbolic geometry that informs the shapes and designs of this craft.

It hasn't been a Norman Rockwell painting, but it's been a fun trip

Norman Rockwell's Family Vacation

I often looked at Norman Rockwell paintings and felt a twinge of jealousy -- wishing that those perfect scenes had been a part of my life story. Then I found out that even Norman Rockwell wished that the scenes he painted had been a part of his real life.

In truth, Rockwell was born in New York City in 1894 and lived a hard-scrabble childhood on the wrong side of the tracks. So his paintings of scrubbed up Americana are really just his own yearnings for a life he never had. The life he did have was exciting and full of creativity and he left a lasting artistic legacy in the hundreds of paintings he did for the cover of the Saturday Evening Post, Life and other magazines.

Georgia On My Mind

O'Keeffe missed her goal by about 18 months. She was 98 when she died in 1986.

Her outsized paintings of flowers have kept the art world buzzing for decades. But here are some details of Georgia O'Keeffe's life and art that you might not know. Click on the artworks to see the hidden facts.

1. Georgia O'Keeffe wanted to live to be 100 years old. When she died in 1986, how old was she?

 

 

2. Though she eventually made New Mexico her permanent home, where was O'Keeffe born.

 

 

 

3. What well-known photographer first exhibited O'Keeffe's work in the 1920s? (He also went on to marry O'Keeffe and take over 700 photo portraits of her.)

 

 

 

Hi Ms. Streep. Have I got a script for you!

Meryl Streep

Just like EVERYONE else, I've got a screenplay in me. A friend and I have been dreaming about writing a perfect film script for Meryl Streep. Dreaming, not doing. But maybe 2012 is our year.

Okay, I won't give you our elevator pitch on our film idea -- because we don't have one. I also won't tell you that we have any connections to Meryl Streep -- except that my friend and co-dreamer, Mary, and I both regard her as the epitome of an actor -- and we both think she'd like to have a beer with us.

Dear Mondo: Could you save me a seat in your lifeboat?

Mondo Guerra

You made it into a lifeboat. Check. But now you're seated just a few feet away from Denver's fashion impresario Mondo Guerra. Quick -- what kinda small talk are you going to make with Mondo? Especially since you know the answer to, "So, how are you enjoying the trip so far?"  Here are some clever conversation starters for you.

Jot these down; you might need them if you bump into Project Runway All Stars champion Mondo Guerra at Frock Out -- Fresh City Life's Titanic-inspired fashion show extravaganza where Mondo will reprise his role as our Special Guest Judge.

1. "Hi Mondo. So....ice we've got. Vodka we need." - only use if iceberg is still in visual range.

2. "Do you find that wearing shorts during a transatlantic crossing is warm enough?"

3. "Just between you and me, I never liked Gretchen."

The Cat That Heard an S.O.S.

Sometimes, when you need a helping hand, a helping paw presents itself.

The Fresh City Life office is buzzing with preparations for our big 2012 fashion event -- Frock Out. Our friend Ann Myhre, who teaches fibers workshops at Fresh City Life, and owns the cool yarn and fabric store Knitty Cat in Centennial, has been helping with many aspects of the runway show. Most importantly, Ann has been consulting with all of our designers -- as our Tim Gunn -- making design suggestions and cheering our designers on.

Titanic Mystery: A Prophecy of the Tragedy?

The Wreck of the Titan, or Futility

Morgan Robertson's novella titled Futility is an engaging fictional account of the ill-fated voyage of the R.M.S. Titanic.

Futility, or The Wreck of the Titan recounts many of the elements that makes Titanic a truly epic story -- the iceberg, the lack of lifeboats, the number that perished. But the most spectacular detail of Robertson's retelling of the Titanic story is that it was written in 1898, a full fourteen years before the actual event!

Here are some of the strange similarities between the novella and the real event:

Frock the Vote

OK Designers, Please put down your scissors, needle and thread. Back slowly away from your sewing machine. It's time for us to vote.

Our twelve Frock Out designers are hard at work on their final pieces for the upcoming runway show and competition in April. Making a nod to the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic in April of 1912, Frock Out will include camp and classic music, a live string quartet and some of Denver's hottest and newest fashion designers. 

Say Chic: YSL descends in Denver

One of the great wonders of the fashion world, Yves Saint Laurent, makes his fashion debut in Denver this month. Actually, YSL won't be here, but his clothes will be.

The retrospective of iconic designer, Yves Saint Laurent, who's clothes became synonymous (along with Halston) with the Studio 54 culture of the 1970s, opens at the Denver Art Museum this Sunday, March 25, 2012.

After 40 years as one of the great impresarios of the fashion world, Yves Saint Laurent retired in 2002 and passed away in June of 2008. His home has become a museum and his fashion oeuvre has become the hottest international art exhibition -- and Denver hosts the retrospective for several months this spring.

Frivolity. Can you use it in a sentence, please?

Fresh City Life is committed to the seriousness of frivolity. The word is frivolity.

​Frivolity. F-r-i-v-o-l-i-t-y. Frivolity.

I still remember the word that ended my spelling bee hopes 30+ years ago: transistor. In a fit of nerves I stalled out at t-r-a-n-s-i, and then when I resumed spelling, I forgot the second 's'. It was a youthful mistake -- that I've never forgotten. I still remember my parents' faces in the audience, trying to puzzle out how I'd missed such a simple word. But hey, it's not like it's haunted me ever since.

So who's up for a Spelling Bee?

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