Staff Picks: January 2023 (All Ages!)

Adult Books | Teen Books | Kid Books

Find out what Denver Public Library staff are reading this month! All titles are available to check out today.

Adult Books

Check out these Staff Recommendations for adult readers!

Asghar, Fatimah

In this heartrending debut, Fatimah Asghar traces the intense bond of three orphaned siblings who, after their parents die, are left to raise one another. The youngest, Kausar, grapples with the incomprehensible loss of her parents as she also charts out her own understanding of gender; Aisha, the middle sister, spars with her "crybaby" younger sibling as she desperately tries to hold on to her sense of family in an impossible situation; and Noreen, the eldest, does her best in the role of sister-mother while also trying to create a life for herself, on her own terms. As Kausar grows up, she must contend with the collision of her private and public worlds, and choose whether to remain in the life of love, sorrow, and codependency she's known or carve out a new path for herself. WHEN WE WERE SISTERS tenderly examines the bonds and fractures of sisterhood, names the perils of being three Muslim American girls alone against the world, and ultimately illustrates how those who've lost everything might still make homes in each other.

Aviv, Rachel

Aviv raises fundamental questions about how we understand ourselves in periods of crisis and distress. Drawing on deep, original reporting as well as unpublished journals and memoirs, Aviv writes about people who have come up against the limits of psychiatric explanations for who they are. She follows an Indian woman, celebrated as a saint, who lives in healing temples in Kerala; an incarcerated mother vying for her children's forgiveness after recovering from psychosis; a man who devotes his life to seeking revenge upon his psychoanalysts; and an affluent young woman who, after a decade of defining herself through her diagnosis, decides to go off her meds because she doesn't know who she is without them.

Bagniewska, Joanna

A quirky collection of Earth's most compelling animals who give mythical creatures a run for their money.

Banwo, Ayanna Lloyd

Banwo's When we were birds is a mythic love story set in contemporary Trinidad & Tobago about two young outsiders brought together by their connection with the dead.

Barrett, Colin

When Colin Barrett's debut Young Skins was published, it swept up several major literary awards, and, in both its linguistic originality and sharply drawn portraits of working-class Ireland, earned Barrett comparisons to Faulkner, Hardy, and Musil. Now, in a blistering follow-up collection, Barrett brings together eight character-driven stories, each showcasing his inimitably observant eye and darkly funny style. A quiet night in a local pub is shattered by the arrival of a sword wielding fugitive; a funeral party teeters on the edge of this world and the next, as ghosts simply won't lay in wake; a shooting sees a veteran policewoman confront the banality of her own existence; and an aspiring writer grapples with his father's cancer diagnosis and in his despair wreaks havoc on his mentor's life. The second piece of fiction from a "lyrical and tough and smart" (Anne Enright) voice in contemporary Irish literature, Homesickness marks Colin Barrett out as our most brilliantly original and captivating storyteller.

Brooks, Elizabeth

1945: War widow Peggy is grateful to have inherited Orchard House from her husband's Aunt Maude; she looks forward to making a fresh start in rural Cambridgeshire with her young son. The moment she sets eyes on the rambling property, however, doubt sets in. From the bricked up cellar to the scent of violets and rotting fruit, the place seems shrouded in dark mysteries. When Peggy discovers Maude's teenage diary gathering dust she begins to read, searching for answers. 1876: Orphaned Maude is forced to leave London, and her adored brother, Frank, to live with a stranger. Everyone-especially Frank-tells her not to trust Miss Greenaway, the enigmatic owner of Orchard House, but Maude can't help warming to her new guardian. Encouraged by Miss Greenaway to speak her mind, follow her curiosity, and form her own opinions, Maude finds herself discovering who she is for the first time, and learning to love her new home in the orchard. But when Frank comes for an unexpected visit, the delicate balance of Maude's life is thrown into disarray. Complicating matters more, Maude witnesses an adult world full of interactions she cannot quite understand with implications beyond her grasp. Her efforts to regain control and right the future as she sees fit result in a violent tragedy, the repercussions of which will haunt Orchard House for the rest of Maude's life-and beyond. Psychologically gripping and masterfully told, Elizabeth Brooks' The House in the Orchard explores the blurred lines between truth and manipulation, asking us who we can trust, how to tell guilt from forgiveness, and whether we can ever really separate true love from destruction.

Crane, Jordan

20 years in the making, the long-awaited graphic novel masterpiece from acclaimed cartoonist Jordan Crane. A young couple is stuck in traffic, reading a book aloud to each other to pass the time. The relationship is already strained, but between the encroaching road rage, and a novel that hits way too close to home, tensions are running especially high by the time they arrive back at their apartment. When one of them leaves to get takeout and a movie, each of the young lovers is individually forced to confront loss, grief, fear, and insecurities in unexpected and shocking ways. Crane's formal use of the comics medium -- threading several timelines and the interior and exterior lives of its protagonists together to create an increasing, almost Hitchcockian sense of dread and paranoia -- is masterful. But as the title hints, there are dualities at its core that make it one of the most exciting works of graphic literary fiction in recent memory, a brilliant adult drama that showcases a deep empathy and compassion for its characters as well as a visually arresting showcase of Crane's considerable talents. Keeping Two is ostensibly a story about loss, but by the end, it just might also be about finding something along the way -- something that had seemed irredeemable up to that point. In that way, it's also a deeply romantic book.

Fofana, Sidik

Eight interconnected stories follow the tenants in the Banneker Homes, a low-income high rise in Harlem where gentrification weighs on everyone's mind, as they weave in and out of each other's lives, endeavoring to escape from their pasts and forge new paths forward.

Frank, Michael

The remarkable story of ninety-nine-year-old Stella Levi whose conversations with the writer Michael Frank over the course of six years bring to life the vibrant world of Jewish Rhodes, the deportation to Auschwitz that extinguished ninety percent of her community, and the resilience and wisdom of the woman who lived to tell the tale.

Gallen, Michelle

A darkly comic novel about three friends working in a shirt factory in Northern Ireland while they plot their escape from their provincial families and the simmering violence of the Troubles.

Gillen, Kieron

Every ninety years, twelve gods return as young people. They are loved. They are hated. In two years, they are all dead. It's happening now. It's happening again.

Hardy, Paula

The complete companion to Japanese culinary culture. Whether it's rubbing your chopsticks together, handing money to a sushi chef or setting your foot directly on the floor when removing your shoes, we'll tell you exactly what not to do to avoid looking like an ignorant tourist. Brush up on restaurant etiquette, local customs and what ingredients to expect in Lonely Planet's Eat Japan. To help you feel prepared for the Japanese food scene we'll cover how, when and where to eat, etiquette dos and don'ts, and what classic regional specialties are a must try. You'll find the best places to eat in every region as well as what to order when you're there and how to eat it. If you are looking for an authentic and immersive foodie experience but don't know where to start, Eat Japan is your answer. In-depth background on local food and traditions Practical info on popular food neighbourhoods.

Hempel, Jessi

By the time Jessi Hempel reached adulthood, everyone in her family had come out, starting a chain reaction of revelations that made them all question their place in the world in new and liberating ways.

Heyam, Kit

Explores the history of transgender and gender nonconforming people, with a focus on those who identified in other than a straightforward binary fashion; on communities in West Africa, Asia, and among Native Americans; and on cross-dressing in World War I prison camps and in entertainment.

Howrey, Meg

A magnetic tale of betrayal, art, and ambition, set in the world of professional ballet, New York City during the AIDS crisis, and present-day Los Angeles Carlisle Martin dreams of becoming a professional ballet dancer just like her mother, Isabel, a former Balanchine ballerina. Since they live in Ohio, she only gets to see her father Robert for a few precious weeks a year when she visits Greenwich Village, where he lives in an enchanting apartment on Bank Street with his partner, James. Brilliant but troubled, James gives Carlisle an education in all that he holds dear in life-literature, music, and most of all, dance. Seduced by the heady pull of mentorship and the sophistication of their lives, Carlisle's aspiration to become a dancer herself blooms, born of her desire to be asked to stay at Bank Street, to be included in Robert and James' world even as AIDS brings devastation to their community. Instead, a passionate love affair creates a rift between them, with devastating consequences that reverberate for decades to come. Nineteen years later, Carlisle receives a phone call which unravels the fateful events of her life, causing her to see with new eyes how her younger self has informed the woman she's become. They're Going to Love You is a gripping and gorgeously written novel of heartbreaking intensity. With psychological precision and a masterfully revealed secret at its heart, it asks what it takes to be an artist in America, and the price of forgiveness, of ambition, and of love.

Iturbide, Graciela

Graciela Iturbide (born in Mexico City, 1942), best known for her powerful photographs of Mexico, is one of the most celebrated and prolific figures in photography. Her work is collected in museums around the world, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Tate Modern, London; and Centre Pompidou, Paris. She has published several monographs, including Images of the Spirit (Aperture, 1996), Eyes to Fly With (2006), and Graciela Iturbide's Mexico (2019). She has won the prestigious Hasselblad Award, as well as the Cornell Capa Lifetime Achievement Award.

Jurczyk, Eva

Liesl Weiss has been (mostly) happy working in the rare books department of a large university, managing details and working behind the scenes to make the head of the department look good. But when her boss has a stroke and she's left to run things, she discovers that the library's most prized manuscript is missing. Liesl tries to sound the alarm and inform the police about the missing priceless book but is told repeatedly to keep quiet to keep the doors open and the donors happy. But then a librarian goes missing as well. Liesl must investigate both disappearances, unspooling her colleagues' pasts like the threads of a rare book binding as it becomes clear that someone in the department must be responsible for the theft. What Liesl discovers about the dusty manuscripts she has worked among for so long-and about the people who preserve and revere them-shakes the very foundation on which she has built her life.

Kells, Claire

In a remote corner of Alaska, Investigative Services Bureau agent Felicity Harland squares off against a mysterious cult leader with potentially deadly motives when she joins with her partner, Hux, to investigate the deaths of a young couple in Gates of the Arctic National Park.

Khong, Rachel

"Incredibly poignant . . . Rachel Khong's first novel sneaks up on you -- just like life . . . and heartbreak. And love."--Miranda July A few days after Christmas in a small suburb outside of L.A., pairs of a man's pants hang from the trees. The pants belong to Howard Young, a prominent history professor, recently diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Howard's wife, Annie, summons their daughter, Ruth. Freshly disengaged from her fiance and still broken up about it, feeling that life has not turned out quite the way she planned, thirty-year- old Ruth quits her job, and arrives home to find her parents' situation worse than she'd realized. Her father is erratically lucid and her mother, a devoted and creative cook, sees the sources of memory loss in every pot and pan. But as Howard's condition intensifies, the comedy in Ruth's situation takes hold, gently transforming her grief. She throws herself into caretaking: cooking dementia-fighting meals (a feast of jellyfish!), researching supplements, anything to reignite her father's once-notable memory. And when the university finally lets Howard go, Ruth and one of her father's handsome former students take their efforts to help Howard one step too far. Told in captivating glimpses and drawn from a deep well of insight, humor, and unexpected tenderness, Goodbye, Vitamin pilots through the loss, love, and absurdity of finding a one's footing in this life.

Kurkov, Andreĭ

Sergey Sergeyich is one of the last residents of a Ukrainian village in the "Grey Zone," a no-man's-land between loyalist and separatist forces in Crimea. Sergeyich's one pleasure in life is taking care of his bees. As spring approaches, he knows he must move the bees to a place they can safely collect pollen. On his journey, he will meet people on both sides of the battle lines in a country torn by war and chaos.

Machado, Carmen Maria

The author's engrossing and wildly innovative account of a relationship gone bad, and a bold dissection of the mechanisms and cultural representations of psychological abuse. Tracing the full arc of a harrowing relationship with a charismatic but volatile woman, Machado struggles to make sense of how what happened to her shaped the person she was becoming.

Murata, Sayaka

With Life Ceremony, the incomparable Sayaka Murata, whose Convenience Store Woman has now sold more than a million copies worldwide, returns with a brilliant and wonderfully unsettling collection, her most recent fiction to be published in Japan. In these twelve stories, Murata mixes an unusual cocktail of humor and horror and turns the norms and traditions of society on their head to better question them. In "A First-Rate Material," Nana and Naoki are happily engaged, but Naoki can't stand the conventional use of deceased people's bodies for clothing, accessories, and furniture, and a disagreement around this threatens to derail their perfect wedding day. "Lovers on the Breeze" is told from the perspective of a curtain in a child's bedroom that jealously watches the young girl Naoko as she has her first kiss with a boy from her class and does its best to stop her. "Eating the City" explores the strange norms around food and foraging, while "Hatchling" closes the collection with an extraordinary depiction of the fractured personality of someone who tries too hard to fit in. In these strange and wonderful stories of family and friendship, sex and intimacy, belonging and individuality, Murata asks what it means to be a human in a world that often seems very strange, and offers answers that surprise and linger.

O'Brien, Mary

A full color field guide to over 130 native and non-native plants from the foothills to the alpine of the Southern Rockies. It is written for the curious first-time forager as well as the more advanced harvester of edibles and medicinals. Each plant entry contains full color pictures, descriptions for identification, edible and medicinal uses, gardening tips, other uses and cautions. A section on poisonous plants is included. Also found throughout are tips for harvesting and preparation, recipes, stories, poems, natural history and science facts.

Polk, C. L.

An exiled augur who sold her soul to save her brother's life is offered one last job before serving an eternity in hell. When she turns it down, her client sweetens the pot by offering up the one payment she can't resist: the chance to have a future where she grows old with the woman she loves. To succeed, she is given three days to track down the White City Vampire, Chicago's most notorious serial killer. If she fails, only hell and heartbreak await.

Robinson, Shauna

Maggie Banks's life is a bit of a mess. After losing a job and moving back home with her parents, she's desperate for a new Life Plan. So when her best friend asks for help running her struggling bookstore in the quaint town of Bells River, Maggie jumps on the opportunity. She doesn't even like books, per se, but anything's better than obsessively checking job boards from her childhood bedroom. It turns out Maggie's not prepared for small-town life. More specifically, the strict rules enforced by the local historical society: the bookstore is only allowed to sell 'classics.' But with a town full of people looking for fresh stories, Maggie knows she'll have to get creative to keep the store afloat.

Smale, Alan

In an alternate 1979, the United States and the Soviet Union have permanent Moon bases, crewed spy satellites, and frequent hostilities. Vivian Carter, commander of Apollo 32, is on a mission to explore a volcanic region of the Moon when she is caught in the crossfire of a Soviet attack. Barely escaping, she and her crew are redirected to land at Hadley Base, a NASA outpost. Hadley Base, though, soon comes under attack, and the unarmed astronauts must find a way to defend themselves.

Smith, Patti

In 2018, without any plan or agenda for what might happen next, Patti Smith posted her first Instagram photo: her hand with the simple message 'Hello Everybody!' Known for shooting with her beloved Land Camera 250, Smith started posting images from her phone including portraits of her kids, her radiator, her boots, and her Abyssinian cat, Cairo. Followers felt an immediate affinity with these miniature windows into Smith's world, photographs of her daily coffee, the books she's reading, the graves of beloved heroes--William Blake, Dylan Thomas, Sylvia Plath, Simone Weil, Albert Camus. Over time, a coherent story of a life devoted to art took shape, and more than a million followers responded to Smith's unique aesthetic in images that chart her passions, devotions, obsessions, and whims. Original to this book are vintage photographs: anniversary pearls, a mother's keychain, and a husband's Mosrite guitar. Here, too, are photos from Smith's archives of life on and off the road, train stations, obscure cafés, a notebook always nearby. In wide-ranging yet intimate daily notations, Smith shares dispatches from her travels around the world. With over 365 photographs taking you through a single year, A Book of Days is a new way to experience the expansive mind of the visionary poet, writer, and performer. Hopeful, elegiac, playful--and complete with an introduction by Smith that explores her documentary process--A Book of Days is a timeless offering for deeply uncertain times, an inspirational map of an artist's life.

Takei, George

Graphic novel memoir of George Takei's childhood imprisoned in American concentration camps for people of Japanese descent during World War II.

Tamblyn, Amber (editor)

Amber Tamblyn, Jessica Valenti, Lidia Yuknavitch, Jia Tolentino, Samantha Irby, Meredith Talusan, Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley, Amy Poehler, America Ferrera, Ada Limón, and Huma Abedin are among the impressive list of authors contributing to this powerful collection of essays that takes a fresh and powerful look at our relationship to intuition and how we can harness it to change our everyday lives and the world. For generations, women have been taught to ignore their intuitive intelligence, whether in their personal lives or professional ones, in favor of making logical, evidence-based decisions. But what if that small voice or deeper knowing was our greatest gift, an untapped power we could use to affect positive change? Edited by award-winning author, activist, and actress Amber Tamblyn, Listening in the Dark is a compilation of some of today's most striking women visionaries across industries--in literature, science, art, education, medicine, and politics--who share their experiences engaging with their own inner wisdom in pivotal, crossroad moments. Filled with deeply personal and revelatory essays, Listening in the Dark will empower readers to reconnect with their own unique intuitive process, to see it as the precious resource it is, and to be unafraid to listen to all that it has to say and all that it has to offer.

Twist, Arielle

In her powerful debut collection of poetry, Arielle Twist unravels the complexities of human relationships after death and metamorphosis. In these spare yet powerful poems, she explores, with both rage and tenderness, the parameters of grief, trauma, displacement, and identity. Weaving together a past made murky by uncertainty and a present which exists in multitudes, Arielle Twist poetically navigates through what it means to be an Indigenous trans woman, discovering the possibilities of a hopeful future and a transcendent, beautiful path to regaining softness.

Tynion, James, IV

Everyone who was invited to the house knows Walter--well, they know him a little, anyway. Some met him in childhood; some met him months ago. And Walter's always been a little...off. But after the hardest year of their lives, nobody was going to turn down Walter's invitation to an astonishingly beautiful house in the woods, overlooking an enormous sylvan lake. It's beautiful, it's opulent, it's private--so a week of putting up with Walter's weird little schemes and nicknames in exchange for the vacation of a lifetime? Why not? All of them were at that moment in their lives when they could feel themselves pulling away from their other friends; wouldn't a chance to reconnect be...nice? In The Nice House on the Lake, the overriding anxieties of the 21st century get a terrifying new face-and it might just be the face of the person you once trusted most.

Valente, Catherynne M.

Catherynne M. Valente, the bestselling and award-winning creator of Space Opera and The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland returns with The Past is Red, the enchanting, dark, funny, angry story of a girl who made two terrible mistakes: she told the truth and she dared to love the world. The future is blue. Endless blue...except for a few small places that float across the hot, drowned world left behind by long-gone fossil fuel-guzzlers. One of those patches is a magical place called Garbagetown. Tetley Abednego is the most beloved girl in Garbagetown, but she's the only one who knows it. She's the only one who knows a lot of things: that Garbagetown is the most wonderful place in the world, that it's full of hope, that you can love someone and 66% hate them all at the same time. But Earth is a terrible mess, hope is a fragile thing, and a lot of people are very angry with her. Then Tetley discovers a new friend, a terrible secret, and more to her world than she ever expected.

Wadud, Asiya

Crosslight for Youngbird explores the slipperiness of borders, as well as borders' tentacles: mother tongue, language and mastery, citizenship and nationality, migration and flight. These poems are concerned with the demands we make on our body, the limits of those demands, and ultimately, how everyone inhabits space.

Walsh, Jane

In the quiet seaside town of Inverley, nothing exciting ever happens to gently bred spinsters like Miss Arabella Seton. Content with her watercolor paintings and her cats, she is confident that no one suspects her forbidden and unrequited passion for her best friend, Caroline. The eldest in a family of six children, Miss Caroline Reeve has the unenviable task of shepherding her siblings into adulthood with little coin and even less patience. The only benefit to being an eternal chaperone is that no one ever expects her to marry. When the Reeve family inherits an unexpected fortune, Caroline must take her rightful place in high society. Fortune hunters abound, and it is up to Arabella to save her from their snares and convince her that love has been in front of her all along. Can the heiress and the spinster discover an unconventional love outside of the Marriage Mart?

Williams, Michael Kenneth

A moving, unflinching memoir of hard-won success, struggles with addiction, and a lifelong mission to give back-from the late iconic actor beloved for his roles in The Wire, Boardwalk Empire, and Lovecraft Country When Michael K. Williams died on September 6, 2021, he left behind a career as one of the most electrifying actors of his generation. From his star turn as Omar Little in The Wire to Chalky White in Boardwalk Empire to Emmy-nominated roles in HBO's The Night Of and Lovecraft Country, Williams inhabited a slew of indelible roles that he portrayed with a rawness and vulnerability that leapt off the screen. Beyond the nominations and acclaim, Williams played characters who connected, whose humanity couldn't be denied, whose stories were too often left out of the main narrative. At the time of his death, Williams had nearly finished a memoir that tells the story of his past while looking to the future, a book that merges his life and his life's work. Mike, as his friends knew him, was so much more than an actor. In Scenes from My Life, he traces his life in whole, from his childhood in East Flatbush and his early years as a dancer to his battles with addiction and the bar fight that left his face with his distinguishing scar.

Teen Books

Check out these Staff Recommendations for teen readers!

Boo, Sweeney

Mindy is a young woman living with an eating disorder and trapped in a battle for her own self-worth. When she accidentally discovers something that will give her a chance to revisit her past, she thinks she has a chance to put her life back on track. But will she be able to find a way back to her present and treat herself with love and kindness at any size?

Emezi, Akwaeke

There are no monsters anymore. In the city of Lucille, Jam and her best friend, Redemption, have grown up with this lesson all their lives. Then Jam meets Pet, a creature made of horns and colors and claws, who emerges from one of her mother's paintings and a drop of Jam's blood. Pet has come to hunt a monster-- and the shadow of something grim lurks in Redemption's house. How do you save the world from monsters if no one will admit they exist?

Lee, Susan

Hannah Cho had the next year all planned out--the perfect summer with her boyfriend, Nate, and then a fun senior year with their friends. But then Nate does what everyone else in Hannah's life seems to do--he leaves her, claiming they have nothing in common. He and all her friends are newly obsessed with K-pop and K-dramas, and Hannah is not. After years of trying to embrace the American part and shunning the Korean side of her Korean American identity to fit in, Hannah finds that's exactly what now has her on the outs. But someone who does know K-dramas--so well that he's actually starring in one--is Jacob Kim, Hannah's former best friend, whom she hasn't seen in years. He's desperate for a break from the fame, so a family trip back to San Diego might be just what he need that is, if he and Hannah can figure out what went wrong when they last parted and navigate the new feelings developing between them.

McCoola, Marika

A young pottery student finds her artistic voice and first love at an art camp, while also coping with feelings of guilt and worry about her best friend, who recently attempted suicide.

Woodfolk, Ashley

Two girls. One wild and reckless day. Years of tumultuous history unspooling like a thin, fraying string in the hours after they set a fire. They were best friends. Until they became more. Their affections grew. Until the blurry lines became dangerous. Over the course of a single day, the depth of their past, the confusion of their present, and the unpredictability of their future is revealed. And the girls will learn that hearts, like flames, aren't so easily tamed. It starts with a fire. How will it end?

Yovanoff, Brenna

Don't miss this gripping, emotional prequel to the hit Netflix series, Stranger Things! The never-before-told backstory of the beloved Dig Dug maven, Max Mayfield, written by New York Times bestselling author Brenna Yovanoff. This must-read novel, based on the hit Netflix series, Stranger Things, explores Max's past--the good and the bad--as well as how she came to find her newfound sense of home in Hawkins, Indiana.

Zabarsky, Jessi

Sanja gets taken by Lelek, a witch, and they find themselves on an adventure to discover the truth about Lelek's powers and each other.

Kid Books

Check out these Staff Recommendations for kid readers!

Alexander, Lori

Tick-tock, peek at the clock...It's time for sleep, sweet baby!

Arlow, Jake Maia

Would-be amusement park aficionado Dalia only has two items on her summer bucket list: (1) finally ride a roller coaster and (2) figure out how to make a new best friend. But when her dad suddenly announces that he's engaged, Dalia's schemes come to a screeching halt. With Dalia's future stepsister Alexa heading back to college soon, the grown-ups want the girls to spend the last weeks of summer bonding -- meaning Alexa has to cancel the amusement park road trip she's been planning for months. Luckily Dalia comes up with a new plan: If she joins Alexa on her trip and brings Rani, the new girl from her swim team, along maybe she can have the perfect summer after all. But what starts out as a week of funnel cakes and Lazy River rides goes off the rails when Dalia discovers that Alexa's girlfriend is joining the trip. And keeping Alexa's secret makes Dalia realize one of her own: She might have more-than-friend feelings for Rani.

Balcárcel, Rebecca

Eleven-year-old injured soccer player Luz has a hard enough time reframing her identity as a computer programmer, but when her Guatemalan half-sister moves in, she learns what it truly means to start over. Includes author's note.

Bolden, Tonya

As a mail carrier, Victor Hugo Green traveled across New Jersey every day. But with Jim Crow laws enforcing segregation since the late 1800s, traveling as a Black person in the US could be stressful, even dangerous. So in the 1930s, Victor created a guide -- The Negro Motorist Green-Book -- compiling information on where to go and what places to avoid so that Black travelers could have a safe and pleasant time. While the Green Book started out small, over the years it became an expansive, invaluable resource for Black people throughout the country -- all in the hopes that one day such a guide would no longer be needed,

Brown, Roseanne A.

After her home is attacked by shapeshifting vampires, twelve-year-old Serwa Boateng is sent to live with her aunt and cousin in Maryland, but the aspiring vampire hunter discovers that middle school is harder than it appears on television, especially when she has to avoid detention and turn her classmates into warriors before they become vampire food.

Case, Jonathan

In the twenty-second century, a sun shift has made it impossible for mammals to survive in the daylight, and ten-year-old Elvie and her caretaker, Flora, are studying the migration route of monarch butterflies along what used to be the western coast of the United States, hoping that something in the butterflies wing scales can be used to protect people from the sun and save humanity from extinction.

Gopo, Patrice

A young girl listens as her mother tells her stories of all the places around the world that their family has called home.

Hodge, Susie

Great Art in 30 Seconds takes kids on an exciting tour of some of the world's most famous art movements, artists and works of art from pre-history to the 21st century.

Lambert, Megan Dowd

April and Mae are best friends (and so are their pets). One day angry words are exchanged and they must find a way to apologize and save their friendship.

McNicoll, Elle

When she discovers that her small Scottish town used to burn witches simply because they were different, a neurodivergent girl who sees and hears things others cannot refuses to let them be forgotten.

Mone, Gregory

A mysterious toxic gas is spreading across Eternia, ravaging farmlands and endangering citizens. The planet's only hope lies with Adam, a lost prince with cosmic abilities. When he wields the mystical Sword of Power, he transforms from a scrawny teen into He-Man, the most powerful man in the universe. With his friends Teela, Cringer, Duncan, and Krass by his side, Adam embarks on a dangerous journey, facing pirates, dragons, and perils at every turn in search of Moss Man, a legendary figure who might hold the key to stopping the devastating stench. Yet the sinister Skeletor and his Dark Masters will stop at nothing to thwart the unlikely heroes. The fate of all Eternia rests with He-Man and his friends.

Murphy, Frank

A biography covering Surya Bonaly's rise from a young French girl in love with ice skating to her triumphant backflip landing at the 1998 Olympics. Surya's fearless heart propelled her to always stay true to herself while pursuing her boldest dreams.

Norman, Kim

This truck-themed picture book offers a charming new spin on the classic lullaby "Hush, Little Baby," following a mother and child as they imagine taking the wheel of various vehicles, from a bulldozer to a front-end loader to a giant crane.

Otheguy, Emma

Sofía Acosta, a fifth grader trying to fit into her ballet-obsessed Cuban American family and her affluent suburban New York community, learns to speak up for herself and others when she mistakenly reveals a visiting dancer's plan to defect to the United States.

Paul, Baptiste

Children form teams, build a pitch, and play a joyous game of soccer in a book with English and Creole (as spoken in Saint Lucia) vocabulary words.

Peters, Shawn

Logan, an undersized twelve-year-old orphan with a photographic memory and no filter, discovers that his foster parents are superheroes in grave danger and only Logan's highly logical mind can save them.

Raúl the Third

El Toro and friends make a great team! But that wasn't always the case. A long time ago, they went to Ricky Ratón's School of Lucha, learning everything from strength training to patience. When it comes time for one final test, El Toro and friends have to decide whether working alone is the best way to go or if teaming up might make things easier...and more fun!

Russo, Kristin J.

Come paw-to-paw with eight of your favorite animals! With life-size embosses of common animal tracks from the forest, learn how your paw compares to theirs.

Salati, Doug

A summery picture book about mindfulness, featuring an overheated--and overwhelmed-- canine in need of sea, sand, and fresh air.

Tokuda-Hall, Maggie

Based on a true story of love and resilience at the Minidoka incarceration camp.

Valenti, Karla

In Oaxaca City, Mexico, ancient friends Life and Death discuss free will while engaged in a game of chance, with eleven-year-old Clara as the protagonist of their theories and a pawn in their game, moving inevitably towards her ultimate fate. Includes author's notes and reader's guide.

Yamasaki, Katie

Katie Yamasaki's newest picture book celebrates the life of her grandfather, the acclaimed Japanese American architect Minoru Yamasaki. Minoru Yamasaki described the feeling he sought to create in his buildings as "serenity, surprise, and delight." Here, Katie Yamasaki charts his life and work: his childhood in Seattle's Japanese immigrant community, paying his way through college working in Alaska's notorious salmon canneries, his success in architectural school, and the transformative structures he imagined and built. A Japanese American man who faced brutal anti-Asian racism in post-World War II America and an outsider to the architectural establishment, he nonetheless left his mark on the world, from the American Midwest to New York City, Asia, and the Middle East. This striking picture book renders one artist's work through the eyes of another, and tells a story of a man whose vision, hard work, and humanity led him to the pinnacle of his field.

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