The Image of African Americans in Golden Age Comic Books: Presentation by Comic Book Historian Professor William H. Foster III

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Performance and Presentations
Meeting Room

From the beginning of the rise of comic books in the late 1930s until the mid-1950s, there was a presence of Blacks characters. This presentation will take the audience on a journey to discover how these images paced the historic rise of American Americans in popular culture.

Bio:
William H. Foster III has been a writer since the age of 8 and published since age 11. Poet, essayist, playwright, and editorialist, he has written 15 books and 10 plays. He is presently a Professor of English at Naugatuck Valley Community College in Waterbury, Connecticut. A long-time comic book collector and researcher, Professor Foster has been an expert commentator for both CNN News and National Public Radio. He was a consultant on the historical image of Blacks in both comic strips and comic books for the Words and Pictures Museum of Fine Sequential Art in Northampton, MA, and also a consultant to the 2004 exhibit “Heroes, Heartthrobs, and Horrors: Celebrating Connecticut’s Invention of the American Comic Book” presented by the Connecticut Historical Society.

His exhibit on the “Changing Image of Blacks in Comics” has been displayed at a number of venues across the country, including Temple University’s Paley Library, the 1998 Comic-Con International Comic Arts Conference, the 2000 Festival of Arts and Ideas, and in 2012 for the Texas Visual Arts Association in Dallas. http://www.finallyinfullcolor.com/

For more information please contact the Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library at 720-865-2401 or email blairstaff@denverlibrary.org.

The Image of African Americans in Golden Age Comic Books: Presentation by Comic Book Historian Professor William H. Foster III