Reviews and Blog Posts: classic

Rutanya Alda: Notes on The Deer Hunter

Film and stage actress Rutanya Alda has a great memory about her work in film. Her Mommie Dearest Diaries, a diary of her work in and recollections of making the movie, Mommie Dearest, is currently awaiting its publishing home. In tribute to her eclectic career in film and honoring her upcoming visit to Denver, Fresh City Life is showing two of her other well-known movies -- The Deer Hunter and When a Stranger Calls.

The Sound of Music Sing Along: An International Phenomenon

Given the fact that the real story of the Von Trapps is very different from the story told in the film musical, I wonder why the movie has become one of the most beloved in American cinema. 

Classic Film Showing: Oklahoma! with Shirley Jones

Oklahoma!

It is arguably the finest musical ever translated to film. It's as big and colorful as the state it is named after; Oklahoma! debuts at the Denver Public Library Classic Film Series this Tuesday.

Oklahoma! (1955)
Tuesday, April 29, 6:30-9 p.m.
Central Library, Level B2 Conference Center

American classics

Reviewer Rating:
4

I found this title when searching for currently available eAudiobooks in Denver Public Library’s downloadable emedia website (downloadmedia.denverlibrary.org/). I drive to work and needed something currently available  in small segments to keep me entertained during the trip. The short stories themselves are a diverse mixture, everything from Alice Walker’s Everyday...

Tina, bring me my tights: Joan Crawford's Torch Song as Swan Song

This year, Fresh City Life is celebrating Hollywood Regency style in film. Torch Song, Joan Crawford's musical offering from 1953, is a fabulous and fabulously wrong film. It plays this Tuesday on the big screen.

Crawford always found the zeitgeist. She was a liberated flapper at just the right moment. Then she transformed into a shop girl who makes good to highlight the collapse of the economy. And after WWII, she debuted her last great incarnation for the screen -- a self-empowered and independent woman who didn't need anyone by her side to make her complete. It played beautifully to pre-Women's Movement audiences. And then, when her star began to fade, her film choices became more over-the-top and her characters more broadly sketched.

Classic '70s films

The '70s

Let's re-visit the '70s and remind ourselves what a groovy time it was for movie goers.

Awwww what a time; disco balls, bell bottom jeans, muscle cars, and so much more! But, let's not forget that this was also a time for movies that were just plain awesome. They say that the golden age of movies was between 1927 and 1963, but I feel that is premature. If you really look at the number of films that left a profound impact with film audiences in the '70s, you would agree that 1963 date should be extended to 1979. If you're interested, you can also check out the links below to learn interesting facts about these films.

All Doris, All Day: A Film Tribute

An early studio portrait of Doris Day.

Doris Day, the reluctant movie star, stopped making films in 1968, and yet she remains one of the most popular film actresses in the world. Not bad for little Doris Mary Ann Kappelhoff of Cincinnati.

Hers is a life worthy of a Hollywood movie. Doris longed for a simple life of marriage and kids, but a mother with aspirations toward dancing and singing pushed Doris into performing. By the time she was 17, she was singing on a local radio station and was discovered by bandleader Barney Rapp, who changed her last name to Day.

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