Green Valley Ranch Branch Library

Latest News

The Green Valley Ranch Branch Library opened to the public on Wednesday, March 9, 2011. A Grand Opening Celebration took place on March 12.

Images and Video

Video Tour of GVR

Photos of the New Branch

Images of the new Green Valley Branch Library
<< Previous Play/Pause Next >>

Architect's Renderings

Click on image to enlarge
Main Entry
Main Entry
North Entry
North Entry
Southeast Approach/Parking
Southeast Approach/Parking
Fireplace in Inquire
Fireplace in Inquire
Entry to South Porch
Entry to South Porch
North Approach
North Approach

Overview

On November 6, 2007, Denver voters passed 9 ballot initiatives aimed at maintaining the City's critical infrastructure now and into the future. Issue 1C included funding to design and construct a new branch Library in the Green Valley Ranch neighborhood.

Green Valley Ranch Branch Library Site
Green Valley Ranch Branch Library Site - 4856 Andes Court

The recent growth in Denver's residential and business communities has created gaps in Denver Public Library's ability to serve all the people of Denver. Because of the location of Green Valley Ranch (approximately eight miles south of DIA) it is difficult for residents to access the nearest branch, the Montbello Branch Library, located six miles from the Green Valley Ranch town center. Accordingly, the City of Denver and the Denver Public Library are in the process of working with consultants in an effort to design and construct a Library in Green Valley Ranch in order to provide essential library services for the residents of that part of the City.

Exterior Site Plan
Architect's Exterior Site Plan

The $11.4 million dollar GVR Library, located at 4586 North Andes Court, is the first of three Better Denver Bond funded, newly constructed Denver Public Library branches to be completed or to begin construction as part of the Better Denver Bond library improvements.

The new 26,000 square foot facility incorporates the latest in library technology including customer self-checkout stations and an automated handling system utilizing Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology, making the checkout of materials quicker and ensuring better tracking and accessibility of Library collections.

The Library branch also boasts fifty public computers, wi-fi accessibility, a lounge complete with a fireplace and views of the outdoors, areas for children with youth-friendly furniture, a sub-dividable 100-seat community room, small meeting rooms, and even an airplane cockpit provided by United Airline’s Training Facility that encourages imagination and shared learning for visitors of all ages.

"I’m excited about this new Library and the difference it will make in Green Valley and the surrounding area," says Councilman Michael Hancock. "Everything about the Library, especially the fabulous access to computers, will add so much to the area’s quality of life. Thanks to all the citizens who participated in the Library’s planning and design brainstorming, and thanks to the voters for endorsing the Better Denver Bonds."

As part of the City’s commitment to Greenprint Denver initiatives, the Library was designed and constructed with the goal of achieving Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold Certification through sustainable construction approaches recognized by the U.S. Green Building Council. Through the use of recycled and regional materials, materials with low emissions, low-flow water fixtures, solar tubes, day-lighting, and evaporative cooling systems the facility is estimated to use approximately 60% less energy and 40% less water annually than those buildings using conventional design approaches.

The Architecture: Plains and Planes

The vision for the Branch’s physical design was derived from community comments emphasizing the building’s relation to the plains landscape and the airplanes of the nearby Denver International Airport. Humphries Poli Architects specifically designed the building to accentuate the "i-Plains" and the "e-Planes" concept with an aerodynamic roof form, structural detailing developed from early aircraft design, and long and linear shapes that echo strip farming and other dry-land agricultural techniques.

Additional character-defining features include a roof-line divided into four distinct levels, or "planes," and a beautiful xeriscaped garden (the "outdoor library,") which mirrors these four planes.

Back to top