Margaret Miller's blog

The New England Scene: under the radar writers doing big things

Inferno

Looking for some writers who have gathered a cult following, but may not make it onto your radar? Eileen Myles and Michelle Tea have been at the writing gig for quite some time. Tea is known as the predecessor of Myles and not simply because of their similar Boston backgrounds. They both write frank, honest, and deeply complex considerations of what it means to be female, gay, and a writer. Their upbringings give the backdrop to take ink to paper and write.

Their language picks you apart and asks you to hold up high the raw material they produce. It is no secret that female writers, especially of the obscure variety, remain that, a secret, without hitting it big in the mainstream. If you're looking for your expectations to be fulfilled, Myles and Tea aren't for you. If you're into writers moving towards a liminal space and disregarding censorship and societal norms, Myles and Tea are waiting for you.

Eileen Myles's collection of works include:

Friday Night Lights: Best TV Series You Were Not Watching

http://sharetv.org/shows/friday_night_lights

Clear eyes.  Full Hearts.  Can't Lose.  In the first episode of the critcally acclaimed series, Friday Night Lights, this mantra pulls you into a world that feels all too familiar, but holds your breath barely and steadily because this world is all too magical.

How often are you enamoured by a television series's cinematography?  How often is your gut clenched just waiting for the next visceral image?  I would assume this is a rare occurrence.  What is even more surprising is this was not an HBO, Showtime, or AMC series.  Friday Night Lights barely made it through its five seasons due to low ratings, though it possessed extreme critical acclaim.  It has heart and it can be appreciated by any group:

Braid weaves back together for a new EP and two shows

http://www.punknews.org/review/10378

First it was Sunny Day Real Estate who shocked the music scene and reunited for a tour after a break up many years ago. Now Braid, a huge influence in the punk-rock scene of the 90s is putting together a comeback. Or, at the very least, is putting out a new EP.

For context, I am 21 years old. I was not a teenager in the 90s, although there are many days that I wish I had been, or should have been. I like my music loud, energetic, and almost always accompanied by complex and jarring guitar sections. Oh and this guy: Bob Nanna.

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