Kelly's blog

The movies of John Carpenter

The films of John Carpenter are a diverse and interesting bunch - from the frigid terror felt in The Thing, to the bizarre sense of campy paranoia in They Live, there is seemingly something for everyone. Although he has worked with many various genres, Carpenter is most well known for his horror and science fiction films.

His first real hit was the horror classic Halloween, which gave birth to the slasher genre and showed a then unknown Jamie Lee Curtis fighting for her life against a masked maniac. Though their plots and genres are varied, Carpenter’s movies are distinct for several different reasons. Whether it be his continued use of actor Kurt Russell, the minimal lighting, or the scores he composed himself, Carpenter has some unique techniques.

Forgotten Heroes

There is nothing quite as exciting as making a new musical discovery - and that discovery is somehow made sweeter when you stumble upon the sounds of a prolific artist you never really considered before. This happened to me recently when I finally got turned onto the music of Bruce Springsteen - somebody who has been a staple in many people's musical rotations for years.

When I was young my only knowledge of “The Boss” was the song "Born in the U.S.A" - I remember it being blasted at sporting events and on television, and I really had no interest in it (and it’s still not a favorite of mine). I think I was a little too young to have been a Bruce convert from the start - I missed the mania and therefore didn’t understand what the fuss was all about.

I love Freaks & Geeks

Great TV shows are constantly being released on DVD, and the library is a fabulous place to revisit wonderful shows that you may have missed. Freaks & Geeks was a comedy drama that aired during the 1999-2000 television series.

It was produced by Judd Apatow, who brought you various comedy hits such as Knocked Up and The 40 Year Old Virgin.

Why Is My Mother Getting a Tattoo?

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Jancee Dunn first hit the literary scene with her memoir “But Enough About Me: A Jersey Girl’s Unlikely Adventures Among the Absurdly Famous,” published in 2006. Upon starting that memoir, I realized that
I already “knew” Jancee after all. A regular writer for Rolling Stone, Jancee was also an MTV “VJ” on the MTV2 network, and if there’s one thing I knew about as a teenager, it was MTV. Dunn’s
first book was mostly about her career in the music business and all the hilarity and fame brushing that ensued. This second non-fiction contribution (Dunn also has a novel) is a more personal affair, centering on her family life.

In her first offering, Dunn described getting away from her suburban roots and making a career in the male dominated rock journalism world. But as Dunn gets older, she deals with all of the issues that arise when

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