Remembering Candy Givens and Zephyr

Remembering Candy Givens and Zephyr
Remembering Candy Givens and Zephyr Remembering Candy Givens and Zephyr

If you picked up a newspaper on January 27th, 1984, the big news was Michael Jackson's head catching fire during the filming of a Pepsi commercial. A less splashy story was the accidental death of Candy Givens, the 37-year old singer, songwriter and harmonica player of the bluesy Boulder hard rock band Zephyr.

Born in 1947, Candy Ramey came from a family of gamblers and small-time outlaws. They lived in a cabin near Evergreen, but moved to Applewood, a suburb near Golden, when Candy was in the 7th grade. Smart and popular, she was voted most likely to become a famous singer her senior year.

By 1967, Candy had moved to Aspen and performed in a local jug band. She met her future husband, bass guitar player David Givens, and in 1968 the couple moved to Boulder, where they formed the band Brown Sugar. The incredibly gifted guitarist Tommy Bolin and keyboardist John Faris began jamming with the group, and, after the recruitment of Denver drummer Robbie Chamberlain, Zephyr was formed.

Givens had a magnetic stage presence, and a powerful voice in a tiny body. "Candy Givens was a unique musical star that streaked across the Colorado sky and disappeared unexpectedly," observes rock journalist and educator Gil Asakawa. "She had a powerful, throaty voice that could scream the highest rock and roll notes but swoop down to the lowest moaning blues. Her recording with the Colorado band Zephyr are her main legacy, but her voice -- and stories about her -- are scattered here and there within and throughout the local music scene."

Though never a commercial success, Zephyr produced 3 albums and performed live often, including the 1969 Denver Pop Festival, before breaking up in the early '70s. They reunited briefly around 1980, four years after the drug overdose death of Tommy Bolin.

Four years later, Candy drowned in her apartment's Jacuzzi. The toxicology report showed alcohol and Quaaludes in her system.

Years later, in the Tommy Bolin Archives, Candy's ex-husband David wrote:

"Despite her problems, she continued to improve until the last time I heard her sing, in 1983. She was so good by then, that she held a drunken, rowdy party of international rugby players spellbound for the entire time she was on stage. That’s hard."

Comments

I have memories of Tommy Bolin and his wacked-out buddy Michael Roach "adventuring" in Nederland. I loved living in the Boulder/Nederland area in the early 70's, the last time I went back to visit in 2006 the changes only made me sad. The live music scene there in the 70's was wonderful.

Hey, Lisa, Thank you for helping all of us recall Candy and Zephyr!

Thanks David for re-mastering Zephyr's and Candy's work. I will be in line to buy them when they come out.

I never had the opportunity to see Zephyr (any incarnation) or Candy. I was too young to get into the bars. But I had the records (and now CD's). They were the greatest thing to come out of Colorado. I know people will point to Big Head Todd or Firefall. And, of course they are great. But they don't hold a candle to Zephyr. I have attended all of the Bolin-Zephyr tributes in Denver and they were great. The one with Billy Ryan was especially good. I bumped into Eddie Turner at a guitar show a few months ago. I asked him to sign my copy of the last Zephyr record (the one with "Heart Beat") and he said come to a show anytime and he would. I would love to have that on record. Mr. Givens, will that Red Shoes record ever end up on CD? And a neighbor of mine was a friend of the band. I'm looking forward to one day meeting Dave Brown and Allen Brown through him. RIP Tommy, Candy, Jon Faris and Billy Ryan. Best to all.....MC Malthus.

MC Malthus,
I am working through my list of Zephyr projects; one is to remaster and release all of the recordings. I remastered the Heartbeat album just a few months ago and it sounds much better. But first, Going Back To Colorado and more live recordings are going to be released. We are still working on getting a vinyl release out to go with the new box set of the first album. Thanks for your kind words and your support. D.

Thanks, David, for letting us know that a box set is on the way; that's great news for Zephyr fans everywhere.

Great Voice!! Great Band!!! One of the brightest moments in the History of Colorado Music. Hope to see you at the Bolin Fest sometime soon David!! Colorado misses you!!

It's hard to say how thankful I am for this article. I was a wild 12 year old running around Boulder with a head full of quandary and a heart full of hope. Candy was a true heroine to me. Her straightforward sincerity came through her voice. I wanted to BE her! While most of the other woman (of course there were some amazing exceptions as the '70's was an amazing time to be an artist! - think Joni Mitchell, Patti Smith etc.) were playing groupie here was Candy a full rock star! She held her own amidst some amazing musicians none the least her amazing husband! My few happy memories of youth were Boulder, Colorado with Candy, Zephyr and the great Tommy Bolin. She was incandescent in a very real and grounded way! Forever Young Candy! You won't be forgotten. 40 years later you still remain a shining star in my eyes!

There is a list of female "rock stars" that don't have half Candy's talent.

Was lucky to have seen Zephyr several times in the late 60s and early 70s. Every show was a treat, Candy was one talented lady
We used to joke how she acted like a female Mick Jagger prancing on stage. I was devastated the day she died, what a talent.

Post new comment