How much is that vinyl in the window?

Rare & Hard to Find Vinyl
Goldmine Standard Catalog of American Records Girl with vinyl Led Zeppelin The Final Option New Edition Lost In Love

We recently got a new turntable (an upgrade from the $99 Sony turntable that I got a few years ago at Best Buy). The guy I bought it from said that it was a great entry-level audiophile choice, so I guess I'm now an entry-level audiophile. It's been great – now we just need better speakers.

I've never not had any vinyl LPs... the small record collection I built during the '80s did whittle down during the '90s but there were still a few in a box somewhere that I got back. The rippled Prince 1999 album that got left in the sun and that I was able to somehow press back into play-able shape with an iron is forever lost. The needle always looked like it was riding waves in the ocean.  

So now we go record shopping again! Sometimes for new albums but often to replace records I used to have. I'm not a collector but it's really cool to check prices for LPs and 45s and to see what's considered valuable.  

Check out the latest editions of the Goldmine Record Album Price Guide and the Goldmine Standard Catalog of American Records. You'll get listings of pricing info but also some great guidance for collecting 45s, picture sleeves and EPs, 12-inch singles, albums and selected 78 RPM records. You can also read about why "a still-sealed record is the record-collecting equivalent of the paradoxical thought experiment called 'Schrödinger's cat'."  

The price guides are available in Reference on Level 3 at the Central Library. Stop in to take a look at them and stay all day! Find out how much a near mint 1973 copy of Led Zeppelin's "White label promo only" Houses of the Holy album would be worth!  

Don't have a library card? Check out how to get one now!

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Comments

I'm glad to be reminded of these guides. Back in the early and mid-80's, I was collecting every album that came out of Athens, GA. REM and the B-52s were from Athens so, you know, it had to be true that everything originating there was a classic in the making -- at least, to my 20 year old brain it was. I still have them all, have moved with them many times, just waiting for the day when my foresight would be rewarded. I'll let you know if my retirement is imminent.

I have a record collection that has been passed down to me from my uncles. They collected 70s era reggae (Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Jacob Miller etc). I brought that collection with me from the Caribbean and it has moved here to Colorado with me. To me, there is nothing like the sound of a record on vinyl, and though I haven't added much to the collection I will try to do so as the budget permits.

You can find some great stuff at reasonable prices on E. Colfax and S. Broadway!

Yes! I also like SecondSpin on Colorado Blvd.

Haven't checked them out yet!

It's surprising how many LPs didn't make the transition to CD's, such as Dave Brubeck's Summit Sessions, a record I bought in Boulder in the 70's. Luckily, we now have a handy player that converts vinyl to CD.

Those are handy and a great way to get them converted. I thought about getting the model that has the converter but then I decided against it to force myself to listen to vinyl only on the record player.

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