Gabriel García Márquez, 1927-2014

Gabriel García Márquez, photo
Book Cover: One Hundred Years of Solitude, Spanish edition Book Cover: Of Love and Other Demons

Gabriel García Márquez died yesterday at the age of 87. NPR has a great audio remembrance of his life and legacy. It mentions his acceptance speech for the Nobel Prize for Literature he won in 1982. If you've never read it, it's an amazing speech, weaving together the magic and reality of Latin America in a beautiful piece of writing that's moving, sad in parts, and insightful, yet filled with touches of delight and humor--and ultimately hopeful. This link takes you to an article with the full text in the original Spanish and here is the speech in English.

We have many of his books (along with biographies and literary criticism) in Spanish and English (and even one or two in Korean, Vietnamese, Russian, and French).

Comments

I remember Gabriel Garcia Marquez for reading many
plays, Poetry and short stories. But he did a book
on El Siglo de Oro which signifiys the Golden Ages of
Spain and its territories and conquers. Also his love
poems. A very good metaphorical writer for the Spanich
and American cultures and history.

One Hundred Years of Solitude is one of my favorite books. It really blew me away the first time I read it many years ago. Will need to revisit soon. Thanks for the nice post on a great and truly original artist.

I love El coronel no tiene quien le escriba. It's one of my all time favorites. Thank you for sharing your tribute.

I grew up in the Caribbean and I studied Spanish for A levels. I remember working with my tutor on Marquez's novella "El Coronel no tiene quien le escriba" (No one writes to the Colonel) about an old retired Colonel who is forever waiting for a letter that will bring his pension. Marquez did such a great job of portraying the colonel that you couldn't help but root for him even though you sensed that he was a tragic hero. This book is very much unlike his well known tome "Cien anos de soledad" which sweeps one up into a fantastical place called Macondo. The world has truly lost a titan of literature. RIP Gabo

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