Barbarella Meets Brini: When Girls Collide

Jane Fonda as Barbarella
Author, hostess and style maven, Brini Maxwell Jenny Agutter in Logan's Run Max Von Sydow in Flash Gordon

Houston, we have a FABULOUS problem.

Almost Midnight -- our 10th anniversary film series -- really goes into orbit this Tuesday when Fresh City Life presents one of the campiest, cult Sci-Fi movies ever made.

Barbarella: Film presentation hosted by author Brini Maxwell
Tuesday, October 16, 6-9 p.m.

Join Fresh City Life for an extraordinary night at the movies. New York author, hostess and trendsetter, Brini Maxwell brings her spin to our showing of the outrageous 1968 Jane Fonda confection, Barbarella, directed by Roger Vadim. The tagline for this film claims that "Barbarella is a woman who makes Science Fiction something else," and we decided this film needed a hostess who is something else, too. Style maven Brini Maxwell will be on hand to talk us through Jane Fonda's epic, futuristic turn. Barbarella, Jane and Brini. Hmmm. If our mission is to make a wing-dinger… mission accomplished. (98 minutes. Unrated.) Registration encouraged for this film presentation. Please register online or call 720-865-1206.

This film presentation is followed, on consecutive Tuesdays, by two more great films:

Logan's Run (1976)
Tuesday, October 23, 6-9 p.m. Logan has a big problem: the giant machine that runs his world kinda wants him to find out why everyone isn't happily lining up to die on their thirtieth birthday as instructed. Sounds like an average night at Studio 54 during disco's heyday, right? Well, Logan's Run has got all the best nods to the era, from groovy futuristic, skin-tight clothes (and apparently stretch polyester is super fashionable in the future), a disco-ball party called Renewal in which the coolest guests all explode, and of course, Farrah Fawcett, flashing her fantastic hair and perfect smile.

Flash Gordon (1980)
Tuesday, October 30, 6-9 p.m. The Earth is under attack and Dr. Hans Zarkov kidnaps famous sports hero Flash Gordon and Dale Arden. "If memory serves, this is more or less the same beginning as in the original movie serialization of 'Flash Gordon,' back in 1936. Even if it's not, this new Dino De Laurentiis production is true to the tacky pop origins of the Flash Gordon comic strip and the serials starring Buster Crabbe. At a time when "Star Wars" and its spin-offs have inspired special effects men to bust a gut making their interplanetary adventures look real, Flash Gordon is cheerfully willing to look as phony as it is." – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times.

Full Fresh City Life calendar of events and workshops.

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