Blogs

Guatemala by Chicken Bus

Ever thought about visiting Guatemala? Or just want to take a virtual trip to someplace warm during the cold weather? Join us as we journey to Guatemala with Anna Winkel!

In the fall of 2008 and spring of 2009, Anna, a local librarian, spent 8 months traveling, studying, and volunteering in Guatemala. In this travel slide show, you'll journey by chicken bus from the old capital city of Antigua to the shores of Lago Atitlan to the mountains of Alta Verapaz. Bring your questions about where to go, what to see, and how to get around--by chicken bus or otherwise! Food samples will be included!

To Be A Slave

While browsing the Central book stacks, I re-discovered Julius Lester's To Be A Slave.

An award winning writer and retired professor, Lester delved into the slave narratives collected during the Federal Writers' Project. He selected personal accounts about the experience of the auction block, plantation life, resistance, and emancipation. Published in 1968 and named a Newbery honor book in 1969, To Be A Slave was one of the first nonfiction books in children's literature to share the personal testimonies of slaves.

Introduction to Feng Shui

Ever wanted to learn more about the art of Feng Shui? Here's a program for you!

During my first week as a librarian, I had a young man ask me for books about "fun joy" decorating. We eventually figured out that he really wanted books on Feng Shui. If you too are curious about this art that examines how the energy of space and objects impacts everyday life, join us on Wednesday, January 19 at 6:00 p.m. at the Ross-Cherry Creek branch for this one-hour introduction.

Ted Conover named winner of 2011 Evil Companions Literary Award

Ted Conover

Enjoy martinis, merrymaking and spirited conversation at the 2011 Evil Companions Literary Awards, set for Thursday, April 14 at the Oxford Hotel.

This year's award goes to Ted Conover, a beloved Denver native, nationally acclaimed author, and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His works cover a vast array of subjects, from the rarefied air of Aspen, to riding the rails with hoboes in titles such as The Routes of Man, Newjack, Coyotes, Whiteout, and Rolling Nowhere.

Featuring signature martinis, live music and a scrumptious buffet, and benefiting the Denver Public Library, Evil Companions is a literary event not to be missed. For tickets, visit www.dplfriends.org or call 720-865-2050.

The Coral Thief

The Coral Thief by Rebecca Stott

The Coral Thief by Rebecca Stott is a work of historical fiction that takes place in Paris just after the fall of Napoleon at Waterloo.  Adventure, romance, history and crime are all here in one exciting novel.

This book was made for readers who like the Romantic Period of the early 19th century. At that time the city of lights was on the cutting edge of Western Civilization.  Scientists were just beginning to discover ancient fossils and understand that the earth is millions of years old.  The author has included fictionalized representations of historical persons like the French zoologist and paleontologist Georges Cuvier and the master criminal cum police detective Eugene-Francois Vidocq.

 

Staff Art Show

Staff Art Show

Staff Art Show on display until February 27, 2011.

Next time you're at the Central Library, plan on spending some extra time to make your way up to Level 7. The beautiful Vida Ellison Gallery is housing this exhibit of fine art created by staff for the 8th consecutive year.

In addition to highlighting the creativity, diversity and individuality of the Denver Public Library staff, the gallery offers spectacular views of downtown Denver. Not to be missed!

A beautiful "coffee table" book that is both informative and fun

The Elements

Even this high school chemistry flunkey found The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe by Theordore Gray an amazing read cover-to-cover.

I pride myself on reading a little bit of this and that, but a book about chemistry wouldn't be on the top of the list. Until recently, that is. While straightening the NEW books I came across The Elements. The visually rich cover enticed me to crack it open. Once at home, I devoured it cover to cover. So there is actually a rhyme and reason to the periodic table!

For the Birds

I just finished reading Wesley the Owl: The Remarkable Love Story of an Owl and His Girl by Stacey O'Brien, and it made me think of the other interesting stories of birds and bird watchers out there.

Wesley is a rescued wild bird who the author, a biologist, raises from when he is just days old. O'Brien's insights into owl behavior, along with this very personal story (and absolutely adorable pictures!), make this an interesting and thought-provoking read. If you're interested in finding out about the diversity of birds, try Sy Montgomery's Birdology: Lessons Learned from a Pack of Hens, a Peck of Pigeons, Cantankerous Crows, Fierce Falcons, Hip Hop Parrots, Baby Hummingbirds, and One Murderously Big Cassowary.

Scotland Rocks!

When most people think of Scottish music, an image of a man in a plaid skirt comes to mind. But there's a lot more than bagpipes and fiddles going on north of Hadrian's Wall.

I'm the sort of person who really likes music, but who doesn't really care a lot about bands. My friends (who are in a very good band called My God Micah) must get exasperated with me because I never know who sings any song and am totally clueless about which bands play what shows where.

FROZEN!

Frozen

JUST LIKE THE SNOW OUTSIDE THIS MOVIE HAS PLENTY OF IT AS WELL.

So I just recently watched this movie FROZEN just because my hold list has gone down and I needed something to watch. I didn't even really think I would like it because I would never put myself in that type of situation. It starts off just normal but not boring where you would want to take it out of your DVD player. It does get pretty intense. I literally had my hands over my mouth because I got so into the movie! I really felt nervous as I watched the horror the people went through as the movie progressed.

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